What are the best Francois de la Rochefoucauld quotes?

Accurate and famous quotes by Francois de la Rochefoucauld about love, people, jealousy, envy, friends. Francois de la Rochefoucauld is well-known French writer with many wise quotes. You can read the best of all time and enjoy Top 10 lists. Share the best Francois de la Rochefoucauld sayings with your friends and family.


  1. However rare true love may be, it is less so than true friendship.


  2. Most of our faults are more pardonable than the means we use to conceal them.


  3. True love is like ghosts, which everyone talks about and few have seen.


  4. Few people have the wisdom to prefer the criticism that would do them good, to the praise that deceives them.




  5. We promise according to our hopes and perform according to our fears.


  6. We would frequently be ashamed of our good deeds if people saw all of the motives that produced them.

    • motivational

  7. Those who occupy their minds with small matters, generally become incapable of greatness.


  8. Chance corrects us of many faults that reason would not know how to correct.


  9. We like to see others, but don't like others to see through us.


  10. Those who are incapable of committing great crimes do not readily suspect them in others.


  11. We would rather speak badly of ourselves than not talk about ourselves at all.


  12. No persons are more frequently wrong, than those who will not admit they are wrong.


  13. It's easier to be wise for others than for ourselves.


  14. To achieve greatness one should live as if they will never die.


  15. Weak people cannot be sincere.


  16. Not all those who know their minds know their hearts as well.


  17. To know how to hide one's ability is great skill.


  18. Some beautiful things are more impressive when left imperfect than when too highly finished.


  19. Hope and fear are inseparable.


  20. There is no disguise which can hide love for long where it exists, or simulate it where it does not.

    • love

  21. The height of cleverness is being able to conceal it.


  22. We are so accustomed to disguise ourselves to others that in the end we become disguised to ourselves.


  23. We may give advice, but not the sense to use it.


  24. There is only one kind of love, but there are a thousand imitations.


  25. Good advice is something a man gives when he is too old to set a bad example.

    • advice

  26. We can never be certain of our courage until we have faced danger.


  27. Weakness of character is the only defect which cannot be amended.


  28. There is hardly a man clever enough to recognize the full extent of the evil he does.


  29. People always complain about their memories, never about their minds.


  30. We all have enough strength to endure the misfortunes of others.




Francois de la Rochefoucauld image quotes

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About Francois de la Rochefoucauld

Where is Francois de la Rochefoucauld from? Francois de la Rochefoucauld is French who said awesome wise words. Well-known and respected in French society for wise sayings. The following quotations and images represent the French nature embed in Francois de la Rochefoucauld's character.

What Francois de la Rochefoucauld was famous for? Francois de la Rochefoucauld is famous writer with many good quotes. Influential and well recognized writer all over the world. Browse a lot of Francois de la Rochefoucauld books and reference books with quotes from Francois de la Rochefoucauld on Amazon.


What are the best love quotes by Francois de la Rochefoucauld?


    True love is like ghosts, which everyone talks about and few have seen.

    • love

    There is no disguise which can hide love for long where it exists, or simulate it where it does not.

    • love

    The more one loves a mistress, the more one is ready to hate her.

    • love

    Men often pass from love to ambition, but they seldom come back again from ambition to love.


    If we are to judge of love by its consequences, it more nearly resembles hatred than friendship.

    • love

    In friendship as well as love, ignorance very often contributes more to our happiness than knowledge.


    We are nearer loving those who hate us than those who love us more than we wish.

    • love

    It is with true love as it is with ghosts; everyone talks about it, but few have seen it.

    • love

    Absence diminishes mediocre passions and increases great ones, as the wind extinguishes candles and fans fires.

    • love

    There are few people who are not ashamed of their love affairs when the infatuation is over.

    • love

    We love those who admire us, but not those whom we admire.

    • love

    What makes lovers never tire of one another is that they talk always about themselves.

    • love

    Love can no more continue without a constant motion than fire can; and when once you take hope and fear away, you take from it its very life and being.


    If there be a love pure and free from the admixture of our other passions, it is that which lies hidden in the bottom of our heart, and which we know not ourselves.


    When we are in love we often doubt that which we most believe.


    Old people love to give good advice; it compensates them for their inability to set a bad example.

    • advice

    All the passions make us commit faults; love makes us commit the most ridiculous ones.


    The reason that lovers never weary each other is because they are always talking about themselves.


    There are very few people who are not ashamed of having been in love when they no longer love each other.


    We always love those who admire us, but we do not always love those whom we admire.


    In love we often doubt what we most believe.

    • believe

    Love often leads on to ambition, but seldom does one return from ambition to love.


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What are the best people quotes by Francois de la Rochefoucauld?


    Few people have the wisdom to prefer the criticism that would do them good, to the praise that deceives them.

    • criticism

    People always complain about their memories, never about their minds.

    • complain

    There are people who in spite of their merit disgust us, and others who please us in spite of their faults.


    Whatever good things people say of us, they tell us nothing new.


    A person well satisfied with themselves is seldom satisfied with others, and others, rarely are with them.

    • people

    Heat of blood makes young people change their inclinations often, and habit makes old ones keep to theirs a great while.


    The moderation of people in prosperity is the effect of a smooth and composed temper, owing to the calm of their good fortune.


    Most people know no other way of judging men's worth but by the vogue they are in, or the fortunes they have met with.


    Old people love to give good advice; it compensates them for their inability to set a bad example.

    • advice

    There are bad people who would be less dangerous if they were quite devoid of goodness.


    We confess our little faults to persuade people that we have no large ones.


    There are very few people who are not ashamed of having been in love when they no longer love each other.

    • ashamed

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What are the best jealousy quotes by Francois de la Rochefoucauld?


    Jealousy contains more of self-love than of love.


    In jealousy there is more of self-love than love.

    • envy

    What makes the pain we feel from shame and jealousy so cutting is that vanity can give us no assistance in bearing them.


    It is not enough to succeed, others must fail.

    • envy

    The sure mark of one born with noble qualities is being born without envy.

    • envy

    Envy is more irreconcilable than hatred.

    • envy

    Live on doubts; it becomes madness or stops entirely as soon as we pass from doubt to certainty.

    • envy

    Jealously is always born with love but it does not die with it.

    • envy

    Jealousy is bred in doubts. When those doubts change into certainties, then the passion either ceases or turns absolute madness.

    • envy

    Jealousy lives upon doubts. It becomes madness or ceases entirely as soon as we pass from doubt to certainty.


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What are the best envy quotes by Francois de la Rochefoucauld?


    Jealousy contains more of self-love than of love.

    • envy

    In jealousy there is more of self-love than love.

    • envy

    It is not enough to succeed, others must fail.

    • envy

    The sure mark of one born with noble qualities is being born without envy.

    • envy

    Envy is more irreconcilable than hatred.

    • envy

    Live on doubts; it becomes madness or stops entirely as soon as we pass from doubt to certainty.

    • envy

    Jealously is always born with love but it does not die with it.

    • envy

    Jealousy is bred in doubts. When those doubts change into certainties, then the passion either ceases or turns absolute madness.

    • envy

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What are the best friends quotes by Francois de la Rochefoucauld?


    However rare true love may be, it is less so than true friendship.

    • friends

    A true friend is the greatest of all blessings, and that which we take the least care to acquire.

    • friends

    It is more shameful to distrust our friends than to be deceived by them.

    • friends

    We easily forgive our friends those faults that do no affect us ourselves.


    Our concern for the loss of our friends is not always from a sense of their worth, but rather of our own need of them and that we have lost some who had a good opinion of us.


    What men have called friendship is only a social arrangement, a mutual adjustment of interests, an interchange of services given and received; it is, in sum, simply a business from which those involved propose to derive a steady profit for their own self-love.

    • friends

    In the misfortunes of our best friends we always find something not altogether displeasing to us.

    • friends

    A true friend is the greatest of all blessings, and that which we take the least care of all to acquire.


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More quotes by Francois de la Rochefoucauld

Want some more good quotations by Francois de la Rochefoucauld? Explore the rest of 277 sayings by Francois de la Rochefoucauld.


Jealousy contains more of self-love than of love.

  • envy

The desire to seem clever often keeps us from being so.

  • intelligence

The more one loves a mistress, the more one is ready to hate her.

  • love

It is easier to appear worthy of a position one does not hold, than of the office which one fills.




The sure way to be cheated is to think one's self more cunning than others.


Listening well and answering well is one of the greatest perfections that can be obtained in conversation.


Self-love is the greatest of all flatterers.


There are few people who are more often in the wrong than those who cannot endure to be so.


Neither the sun nor death can be looked at with a steady eye


Men often pass from love to ambition, but they seldom come back again from ambition to love.

  • again

If it were not for the company of fools, a witty man would often be greatly at a loss.


Silence is the safest course for any man to adopt who distrust himself.


We are more interested in making others believe we are happy than in trying to be happy ourselves.


In jealousy there is more of self-love than love.

  • envy

We always love those who admire us; we do not always love those whom we admire.


When our vices leave us, we like to imagine it is we who are leaving them.


A true friend is the greatest of all blessings, and that which we take the least care to acquire.

  • friends

It is more easy to be wise for others than for ourselves.


Moderation is an ostentatious proof of our strength of character.


What makes vanity so insufferable to us, is that it hurts our own.


Quarrels would not last so long if the fault lay only on one side.


What makes the pain we feel from shame and jealousy so cutting is that vanity can give us no assistance in bearing them.

  • assistance

The intellect is always fooled by the heart.

  • intelligence

It is more shameful to distrust our friends than to be deceived by them.

  • friends

Gracefulness is to the body what understanding is to the mind.


Absence diminishes little passions and increases great ones, as wind extinguishes candles and fans a fire.


Perfect Valor is to do, without a witness, all that we could do before the whole world.

  • bravery

We are never so happy nor so unhappy as we imagine.

  • happiness

If we had no faults of our own, we should not take so much pleasure in noticing those in others.


When our hatred is violent, it sinks us even beneath those we hate.


We say little, when vanity does not make us speak.


Usually we praise only to be praised.


It's the height of folly to want to be the only wise one.

  • wisdom

What makes us so bitter against people who outwit us is that they think themselves cleverer than we are.


In friendship as well as love, ignorance very often contributes more to our happiness than knowledge.

  • contributes

Fortune and humor govern the world.


Whatever good things people say of us, they tell us nothing new.

  • things

Too great a hurry to discharge an obligation is a kind of ingratitude.


When we are unable to find tranquility within ourselves, it is useless to seek it elsewhere.


As one grows older, one becomes wiser and more foolish.


We give advice, but we cannot give the wisdom to profit by it.

  • advice

We do not despise all those who have vices, but we do despise those that have no virtue.


If we are to judge of love by its consequences, it more nearly resembles hatred than friendship.

  • love

There are people who in spite of their merit disgust us, and others who please us in spite of their faults.

  • people

It is not enough to succeed, others must fail.

  • envy

The only thing that should surprise us is that there are still some things that can surprise us.


Men give away nothing so liberally as their advice.

  • advice

It is great cleverness to know how to conceal our cleverness.

  • intelligence

We only confess our little faults to persuade people that we have no big ones.


Lovers never get tired of each other because they are forever talking about themselves.


Our enemies approach nearer to truth in their judgments of us than we do ourselves.


We are nearer loving those who hate us than those who love us more than we wish.

  • love

In most of mankind gratitude is merely a secret hope for greater favours.

  • gratitude

To establish yourself in the world a person must do all they can to appear already established.


The fame of great men ought to be judged always by the means they used to acquire it.


The accent of one's birthplace remains in the mind and in the heart as in one's speech.


Men are more satirical from vanity than from malice.


It is with true love as it is with ghosts; everyone talks about it, but few have seen it.

  • love

If we resist our passions, it is more through their weakness than from our strength.


Passion makes idiots of the cleverest men, and makes the biggest idiots clever.

  • passion

The shame that arises from praise which we do not deserve often makes us do things we should otherwise never have attempted.

  • shame

We easily forgive our friends those faults that do no affect us ourselves.

  • affect

The happiness and misery of men depend no less on temper than fortune.


We seldom find any person of good sense, except those who share our opinions.


They that apply themselves to trifling matters commonly become incapable of great ones.


Everyone complains of the badness of his memory, but nobody of his judgment.


Why is it that our memory is good enough to retain the least triviality that happens to us, and yet not good enough to recollect how often we have told it to the same person?


One forgives to the degree that one loves.


Envy is more irreconcilable than hatred.

  • envy

Few people know how to be old.

  • age

We pardon to the extent that we love.

  • forgiveness

If I advance, follow me! If I retreat, kill me! If I die, avenge me!


How can we expect somebody else to keep our secret if we cannot keep it ourselves?


Ridicule dishonors a man more than dishonor does.


The sure mark of one born with noble qualities is being born without envy.

  • envy

How is it that we remember the least triviality that happens to us, and yet not remember how often we have recounted it to the same person?


Our actions are like the terminations of verses, which we rhyme as we please.


A refusal of praise is a desire to be praised twice.

  • praise

True eloquence consists in saying all that should be said, and that only.


However brilliant an action, it should not be esteemed great unless the result of a great motive.

  • actions

What keeps us from abandoning ourselves entirely to one vice, often, is the fact that we have several.


There are heroes in evil as well as in good.


We are sometimes as different from ourselves as we are from others.


The only good imitations are those that poke fun at bad originals.

  • imitation

We never desire strongly, what we desire rationally.


Absence diminishes mediocre passions and increases great ones, as the wind extinguishes candles and fans fires.

  • love

If it requires great tact to speak to the purpose, it requires no less to know when to be silent.


To safeguard one's health at the cost of too strict a diet is a tiresome illness indeed.


Conceit causes more conversation than wit.

  • conversation

People's personalities, like buildings, have various facades, some pleasant to view, some not.


Our concern for the loss of our friends is not always from a sense of their worth, but rather of our own need of them and that we have lost some who had a good opinion of us.

  • concern

Hypocrisy is the homage that vice pays to virtue.


Nothing is so contagious as an example. We never do great good or evil without bringing about more of the same on the part of others.


There are ways which lead to everything, and if we have sufficient will we should always have sufficient means.

  • desires

Live on doubts; it becomes madness or stops entirely as soon as we pass from doubt to certainty.

  • envy

One cannot answer for his courage when he has never been in danger.


It is easier to know men in general, than men in particular.


Jealously is always born with love but it does not die with it.

  • envy

We often do good in order that we may do evil with impunity.

  • evil

Old people love to give good advice to console themselves for no longer being able to set a bad example.

  • age

The one thing people are the most liberal with, is their advice.

  • advice

There are few people who are not ashamed of their love affairs when the infatuation is over.

  • love

Nothing so much prevents our being natural as the desire to seem so.

  • appearance

The passions are the only orators which always persuade.

  • passion

Nothing prevents one from appearing natural as the desire to appear natural.


The common foible of women who have been handsome is to forget that they are no longer so.


Decency is the least of all laws, but yet it is the law which is most strictly observed.

  • manners

We think very few people sensible, except those who are of our opinion.


It is for want of application, rather than of means that people fail,

  • failure

Only the great can afford to have great defects.

  • mistakes

Bodily labor alleviates the pains of the mind and from this arises the happiness of the poor.


We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore.

  • conversation

Before we set our hearts too much on anything, let us examine how happy are those who already possess it.


Pride does not wish to owe and vanity does not wish to pay.


Our enemies come nearer the truth in the opinions they form of us than we do in our opinion of ourselves.

  • enemy

We seldom find people ungrateful so long as it is thought we can serve them.

  • gratitude

All women are flirts, but some are restrained by shyness, and others by sense.

  • men

Repentance is not so much remorse for what we have done as the fear of the consequences.


All the passions are nothing else than different degrees of heat and cold of the blood.

  • passion

On neither the sun, nor death, can a man look fixedly.

  • death

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Francois de la Rochefoucauld is famous for his passion about love, people, jealousy, envy, friends. Check out great quotations and affirmations on these topics.


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When was Francois de la Rochefoucauld birthday? Francois de la Rochefoucauld was born on 15 September 1613.

Who is Francois de la Rochefoucauld? Some facts about Francois de la Rochefoucauld from biography. François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac (15 September 1613 – 17 March 1680) was a noted French author of maxims and memoirs. His is a clear-eyed, worldly view of human conduct that indulges in neither condemnation nor sentimentality. Born in Paris on the Rue des Petits Champs, a... Read more about Francois de la Rochefoucauld on Wikipedia or watch videos with quotes from Francois de la Rochefoucauld on YouTube. Browse a lot of books about Francois de la Rochefoucauld on Amazon to get more reference.

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