Life is a tragedy for those who feel, and a comedy for those who think.

— Jean De La Bruyere

The most useful Jean De La Bruyere quotes that are glad to read

The sweetest of all sounds is that of the voice of the woman we love.

84

Generosity lies less in giving much than in giving at the right moment.

67

A vain man finds it wise to speak good or ill of himself; a modest man does not talk of himself.

66

No road is to long for him who advances slowly and does not hurry and no attainment is beyond his reach who equips himself with patience to achieve it

63

Courtly manners are contagious; they are caught at Versailles.

54

We are more sociable, and get on better with people by the heart than the intellect.

52

Out of difficulties grow miracles.

52

Children are contemptuous, haughty, irritable, envious, sneaky, selfish, lazy, flighty, timid, liars and hypocrites, quick to laugh and cry, extreme in expressing joy and sorrow, especially about trifles, they'll do anything to avoid pain but they enjoy inflicting it: little men already.

49

A prince wants only the pleasure of private life to complete his happiness.

48

There is as much trickery required to grow rich by a stupid book as there is folly in buying it.

48

Two persons cannot long be friends if they cannot forgive each other's little failings.

38

At the beginning and at the end of love, the two lovers are embarrassed to find themselves alone.

33

About Jean De La Bruyere

Quotes 417 sayings
Nationality French
Profession Philosopher
Birthday August 16, 1645

A person's worth in this world is estimated according to the value he puts on himself.

33

Incivility is not a Vice of the Soul, but the effect of several Vices;

of Vanity, Ignorance of Duty, Laziness, Stupidity, Distraction, Contempt of others, and Jealousy.

33

All of our unhappiness comes from our inability to be alone.

31

When a work lifts your spirits and inspires bold and noble thoughts in you, do not look for any other standard to judge by: the work is good, the product of a master craftsman.

26

Caprice in woman is the antidote to beauty.

25

There are certain things in which mediocrity is intolerable: poetry, music, painting, public eloquence. What torture it is to hear a frigid speech being pompously declaimed, or second-rate verse spoken with all a bad poet's bombast!

24

The rarest things in the world, next to a spirit of discernment, are diamonds and pearls. [Fr., Apres l'esprit de discernement, ce qu'il y a au monde de plus rare, ce sont les diamants et les perles.]

21

The pleasure we feel in criticizing robs us from being moved by very beautiful things.

20

Grief that is dazed and speechless is out of fashion: the modern woman mourns her husband loudly and tells you the whole story of his death, which distresses her so much that she forgets not the slightest detail about it.

20

The most exquisite pleasure is giving pleasure to others.

20

A bachelor's life is a fine breakfast, a flat lunch, and a miserable dinner.

20

A man can keep a secret better than his own. A woman her own better than others.

20

We can recognize the dawn and the decline of love by the uneasiness we feel when alone together.

19

A person's worth in this world is estimated according to the value they put on themselves.

19

Children have neither past nor future; they enjoy the present, which very few of us do.

18

Those who make the worst use of their time are the first to complain of its shortness.

15

A slave has but one master. An ambition man, has as many as there are people who helped him get his fortune.

15

A coxcomb is one whom simpletons believe to be a man of merit.

14

There are some men who turn a deaf ear to reason and good advice, and willfully go wrong for fear of being controlled.

14

We seldom repent talking little, but very often talking too much.

14

The first day one is a guest, the second a burden, and the third a pest.

14

A blockhead cannot come in, nor go away, nor sit, nor rise, nor stand, like a man of sense.

13

Politeness makes one appear outwardly as they should be within.

13

A fool is one whom simpletons believe to be a man on merit.

[Fr., Un fat celui que les sots croient un homme de merite.]

12

Mockery is often the result of a poverty of wit.

12

A man starts upon a sudden, takes Pen, Ink, and Paper, and without ever having had a thought of it before, resolves within himself he will write a Book; he has no Talent at Writing, but he wants fifty Guineas.

12

Children have neither a past nor a future.

Thus they enjoy the present -- which seldom happens to us.

12

A man of moderate Understanding, thinks he writes divinely: A man of good Understanding, thinks he writes reasonably.

12

All men's misfortunes spring from their hatred of being alone.

11

The wise person often shuns society for fear of being bored.

11

A man is thirty years old before he has any settled thoughts of his fortune;

it is not completed before fifty. He falls to building in his old age, and dies by the time his house is in a condition to be painted and glazed.

11

The beginning and the end of love are both marked by embarrassment when the two find themselves alone. [Fr., Le commencement et le declin de l'amour se font sentir par l'embarras ou l'on est de se trouver seuls.]

11

That man is good who does good to others;

if he suffers on account of the good he does, he is very good; if he suffers at the hands of those to whom he has done good, then his goodness is so great that it could be enhanced only by greater sufferings; and if he should die at their hands, his virtue can go no further: it is heroic, it is perfect.

11

This great misfortune -- to be incapable of solitude.

10

It's motive alone which gives character to the actions of men.

10

If it be true that a man is rich who wants nothing, a wise man is a very rich man.

10

We are valued in this world at the rate we desire to be valued.

10
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