Deceivers are the most dangerous members of society. They trifle with the best affections of our nature, and violate the most sacred obligations.

— George Crabbe

The most passioned George Crabbe quotes you will be delighted to read

From powerful causes spring the empiric's gains, Man's love of life, his weakness, and his pains; These first induce him the vile trash to try, Then lend his name, that other men may buy.

60

Better to love amiss than nothing to have loved.

42

Oh, rather give me commentators plain, Who with no deep researches vex the brain; Who from the dark and doubtful love to run, And hold their glimmering tapers to the sun.

16

An infatuated man is not only foolish, but wild.

12

Void of all honor, avaricious, rash, The daring tribe compound their boasted trash Tincture of syrup, lotion, drop, or pill; All tempt the sick to trust the lying bill.

12

Beauties, when disposed to sleep, Should from the eye of keen inspector keep: The lovely nymph who would her swain surprise, May close her mouth, but not conceal her eyes; Sleep from the fairest face some beauty takes, And all the homely features homelier makes.

8

The coward never on himself relies, But to an equal for assistance flies.

7

Anger makes us strong, Blind and impatient, And it leads us wrong;

The strength is quickly lost; We feel the error long.

6

Through the sharp air a flaky torrent flies, Mocks the slow sight, and hides the gloomy skies; The fleecy clouds their chilly bosoms bare, And shed their substance on the floating air.

5

To show the world what long experience gains, requires not courage, though it calls for pains; but at life's outset to inform mankind is a bold effort of a valiant mind.

4

Our farmers round, well pleased with constant gain, like other farmers, flourish and complain.

4

But monument themselves memorials need.

4

About George Crabbe

Quotes 85 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

Fears of sinning let in thoughts of sin.

4

Men of many words sometimes argue for the sake of talking;

men of ready tongues frequently dispute for the sake of victory; men in public life often debate for the sake of opposing the ruling party, or from any other motive than the love of truth.

4

A sly old fish, too cunning for the hook.

3

In general satire, every man perceives A slight attack, yet neither fears nor grieves.

3

Wine, like the rising sun, possession gains, And drives the mist of dullness from the brains, The gloomy vapor from the spirit flies, And views of gaiety and gladness rise.

3

Habit with him was all the test of truth, it must be right: I've done it from my youth.

3

Tis easiest dealing with the firmest mind-- More just when it resists, and, when it yields, more kind.

3

'T was good advice, and meant, my son, Be good.

3

And took for truth the test of ridicule.

3

Books cannot always please, however good; Minds are not ever craving for their food.

3

The gentle fair on nervous tea relies, Whilst gay good-nature sparkles in her eyes; An inoffensive scandal fluttering round, Too rough to tickle, and too light to wound.

3

That all men would be cowards if they dare, Some men we know have courage to declare.

3

Experience finds few of the scenes that lively hope designs.

3

In this wild world the fondest and the best Are the most tried, most troubled and distress'd.

3

To the house of a friend if you're pleased to retire, You must all things admit, you must all things admire; You must pay with observance the price of your treat, You must eat what is praised, and must praise what you eat.

3

Temp'rate in every place--abroad, at home, Thence will applause, and hence will profit come; And health from either--he in time prepares For sickness, age, and their attendant cares.

3

Ease leads to habit, as success to ease. He lives by rule who lives himself to please.

3

Oh, Conscience! Conscience! man's most faithful friend, Him canst thou comfort, ease, relieve, defend; But if he will thy friendly checks forego, Thou art, oh! woe for me, his deadliest foe!

3

Secrets with girls, like guns with boys, are never valued till they make a noise.

3

What is a church?—Our honest sexton tells, 'Tis a tall building, with a tower and bells.

3

He tried the luxury of doing good.

2

Oh how the passions, insolent and strong, Bear our weak minds their rapid course along; Make us the madness of their will obey; Then die and leave us to our griefs as prey!

2

Circles in water as they wider flow The less conspicuous in their progress grow, And when at last they trench upon the shore, Distinction ceases and they're view'd no more.

2

Lo! the poor toper whose untutored sense, Sees bliss in ale, and can with wine dispense; Whose head proud fancy never taught to steer, Beyond the muddy ecstasies of beer.

2

Arrogance is the act of the great; presumption that of the little.

0

Her air, her manners, all who saw admir'd;

Courteous though coy, and gentle though retir'd; The joy of youth and health her eyes display'd, And ease of heart her every look convey'd.

0

Men famed for wit, of dangerous talents vain, Treat those of common parts with proud disdain; The powers that wisdom would, improving, hide, They blaze abroad, with inconsid'rate pride; While yet but mere probationers for fame, They seize the honor they should then disclaim: Honor so hurried to the light must fade, The lasting laurels nourish in the shade.

0

Impertinence will intermeddle in things in which it has no concern, showing a want of breeding, or, more commonly, a spirit of sheer impudence.

0

"Lawyers Are": By law's dark by-ways he has stored his mind with wicked knowledge on how to cheat mankind.

0

I grant indeed that fields and flocks have charms, For him that gazes or for him that farms.

0

Good is done by degrees.

0

Dreams are like portraits; and we find they please because they are confessed resemblances.

0

What is a church? Let Truth and reason speak, They would reply, "The faithful, pure and meek, From Christian folds, the one selected race, Of all professions, and in every place.

0

I paint the cot, As truth will paint it, and as bards will not.

0

In idle wishes, fools supinely stay. Be there a will and wisdom finds a way.

0

See Time has touched me gently in his race, And left no odious furrows in my face.

0

A master passion is the love of news.

0