Science is the systematic classification of experience.

— George Henry Lewes

The most practical George Henry Lewes quotes that are simple and will have a huge impact on you

Books minister to our knowledge, to our guidance, and to our delight, by their truth, their uprightness, and their art.

68

Insight is the first condition of Art.

41

Originality is independence, not rebellion; it is sincerity, not antagonism.

23

Insincerity is always weakness; sincerity even in error is strength.

16

It is unhappily true that much insincere Literature and Art, executed solely with a view to effect, does succeed by deceiving the public.

15

We must never assume that which is incapable of proof.

15

The true function of philosophy is to educate us in the principles of reasoning and not to put an end to further reasoning by the introduction of fixed conclusions.

14

No man ever made a great discovery without the exercise of the imagination.

14

Philosophy and Art both render the invisible visible by imagination.

12

To write much, and to write rapidly, are empty boasts.

The world desires to know what you have done, and not how you did it.

12

Literature is at once the cause and the effect of social progress.

8

Many a genius has been slow of growth.

Oaks that flourish for a thousand years do not spring up into beauty like a reed.

6

About George Henry Lewes

Quotes 105 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Philosopher
Birthday October 16

Murder, like talent, seems occasionally to run in families.

6

The delusions of self-love cannot be prevented, but intellectual misconceptions as to the means of achieving success may be corrected.

6

In the air we breathe, in the water we drink, in the earth we tread on, Life is every where. Nature lives: every pore is bursting with Life ; every death is only a new birth, every grave a cradle.

6

In complex trains of thought signs are indispensable.

6

The magic of the pen lies in the concentration of your thoughts upon one object.

5

Genius is rarely able to give any account of its own processes.

5

Endeavour to be faithful, and if there is any beauty in your thought, your style will be beautiful; if there is any real emotion to express, the expression will be moving.

5

All good Literature rests primarily on insight.

4

When a man fails to see the truth of certain generally accepted views, there is no law compelling him to provoke animosity by announcing his dissent.

4

No deeply rooted tendency was ever extirpated by adverse judgment.

Not having originally been founded on argument, it cannot be destroyed by logic.

4

If you feel yourself to be above the mass, speak so as to raise the mass to the height of your argument.

4

As all Art depends on Vision, so the different kinds of Art depend on the different ways in which minds look at things.

4

In its happiest efforts, translation is but approximation, and its efforts are not often happy. A translation may be good as translation, but it cannot be an adequate reproduction of the original.

4

To some men popularity is always suspicious.

Enjoying none themselves, they are prone to suspect the validity of those attainments which command it.

3

Books have become our dearest companions, yielding exquisite delights and inspiring lofty aims.

3

Literature delivers tidings of the world within and the world without.

3

No man was ever eloquent by trying to be eloquent, but only by being so.

3

A cell is regarded as the true biological atom.

3

The real people of genius were resolute workers not idle dreamers.

3

Remember that every drop of rain that falls bears into the bosom of the earth a quality of beautiful fertility.

3

Most expositions of Aristotle's doctrines, when they have not been dictated by a spirit of virulent detraction, or unsympathetic indifference, have carefully suppressed all, or nearly all, the absurdities, and only retained what seemed plausible and consistent. But in this procedure their historical significance disappears.

3

Among the many strange servilities mistaken for pieties, one of the least lovely is that which hopes to flatter God by despising the world, and vilifying human nature.

3

The separation of Science from Knowledge was effected step by step as the Subjective Method was replaced by the Objective Method: i.e., when in each inquiry the phenomena of external nature ceased to be interpreted on premisses suggested by the analogies of human nature.

3

All bad Literature rests upon imperfect insight, or upon imitation, which may be defined as seeing at second-hand.

3

Heart and Brain are the two lords of life.

In the metaphors of ordinary speech and in the stricter language of science, we use these terms to indicate two central powers, from which all motives radiate, to which all influences converge.

2

Good writers are of necessity rare.

1

To one man a stream is so much water-power, to another a rendezvous for lovers.

1

It will often be a question when a man is or is not wise in advancing unpalatable opinions, or in preaching heresies; but it can never be a question that a man should be silent if unprepared to speak the truth as he conceives it.

1

Ordinary men live among marvels and feel no wonder, grow familiar with objects and learn nothing new about them.

1

Love is blind; couch not his eyes.

1

Speak for yourself and from yourself, or be silent.

1

If the members of a class do not understand -- if those directly addressed fail to listen, or listening, fail to recognize a power in the voice -- surely the fault lies with the speaker, who, having attempted to secure their attention and enlighten their understandings, has failed in the attempt.

0

The artist is called a creator.

0

If a work of art is placed before me, I believe I can enjoy it;

but I do not overlook the fact, that Art is one thing, another thing Amusement; and that people do like amusements, and will run after it.

0

Not only the individual experience slowly acquired, but the accumulated experience of the race, organized in language, condensed in instruments and axioms, and in what may be called the inherited intuitions--these form the multiple unity which is expressed in the abstract term "experience.

0

To love is for the Soul to choose a companion, and travel with it along the perilous defiles and winding ways of life; mutually sustaining, when it is rugged with obstructions, and mutually rejoicing, when rich broad plains and sunny slopes make journeying delight.

0

Individual experiences being limited and individual spontaneity feeble, we are strengthened and enriched by assimilating the experience of others.

0
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