All the choir of heaven and furniture of earth - in a word, all those bodies which compose the frame of the world - have not any subsistence without a mind.

— George Berkeley

The most impressive George Berkeley quotes that will be huge advantage for your personal development

Atheism ... that bugbear of women and fools ... is the very top and perfection of free-thinking. It is the grand arcanum to which a true genius naturally riseth, by a certain climax or gradation of thought, and without which he can never possess his soul in absolute liberty and repose.

48

It is impossible that a man who is false to his friends and neighbours should be true to the public.

43

Few men think, yet all will have opinions.

35

What is mind? No matter. What is matter? Never mind.

35

I had rather be an oyster than a man, the most stupid and senseless of animals.

25

So long as I confine my thoughts to my own ideas divested of words, I do not see how I can be easily mistaken.

24

That thing of hell and eternal punishment is the most absurd, as well as the most disagreeable thought that ever entered into the head of mortal man.

23

Where the people are well educated, the art of piloting a state is best learned from the writings of Plato.

21

The most ingenious men are now agreed, that [universities] are only nurseries of prejudice, corruption, barbarism, and pedantry.

16

Every knave is a thorough knave, and a thorough knave is a knave throughout.

16

There being in the make of an English mind a certain gloom and eagerness, which carries to the sad extreme; religion to fanaticism; free-thinking to atheism; liberty to rebellion.

9

If what you mean by the word "matter" be only the unknown support of unknown qualities, it is no matter whether there is such a thing or no, since it no way concerns us; and I do not see the advantage there is in disputing about what we know not what, and we know not why.

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About George Berkeley

Quotes 71 sayings
Nationality Irish
Profession Philosopher
Birthday October 16

And what are these fluxions? The velocities of evanescent increments.

And what are these same evanescent increments? They are neither finite quantities, nor quantities infinitely small, nor yet nothing. May we not call them the ghosts of departed quantities...?

7

[Christianity] neither enjoins the nastiness of the Cynic, nor the insensibility of the Stoic.

6

Others indeed may talk, and write, and fight about liberty, and make an outward pretence to it; but the free-thinker alone is truly free.

5

Our youth we can have but to-day, We may always find time to grow old.

5

To me it seems that liberty and virtue were made for each other.

If any man wish to enslave his country, nothing is a fitter preparative than vice; and nothing leads to vice so surely as irreligion.

4

If we admit a thing so extraordinary as the creation of this world, it should seem that we admit something strange, and odd, and new to human apprehension, beyond any other miracle whatsoever.

4

The eye by long use comes to see even in the darkest cavern: and there is no subject so obscure but we may discern some glimpse of truth by long poring on it.

4

We have first raised a dust and then complain we cannot see.

4

The fawning courtier and the surly squire often mean the same thing,--each his own interest.

3

Whenever I attempt to frame a simple idea of time, abstracted from the succession of ideas in my mind, which flows uniformly, and is participated by all beings, I am lost and embrangled in inextricable difficulties.

3

[Tar water] is of a nature so mild and benign and proportioned to the human constitution, as to warm without heating, to cheer but not inebriate.

3

It is a mistake, to think the same thing affects both sight and touch.

If the same angle or square, which is the object of touch,be also the object of vision, what should hinder the blind man, at first sight, from knowing it?

3

From my own being, and from the dependency I find in myself and my ideas, I do, by an act of reason, necessarily infer the existence of a God, and of all created things in the mind of God.

3

Whatever the world thinks, he who hath not much meditated upon God, the human soul, and the summum bonum, may possibly make a thriving earthworm, but will most indubitably make a sorry patriot and a sorry statesman.

1

But the velocities of the velocities - the second, third, fourth, and fifth velocities, etc. - exceed, if I mistake not, all human understanding.

0

The method of Fluxions is the general key by help whereof the modern mathematicians unlock the secrets of Geometry, and consequently of Nature.

0

I am apt to think, if we knew what it was to be an angel for one hour, we should return to this world, though it were to sit on the brightest throne in it, with vastly more loathing and reluctance than we would now descend into a loathsome dungeon or sepulchre.

0

Make a point never go clear, it is great odds that a man whose habits and the bent of whose mind lie a contrary way, shall be unable to comprehend it. So weak a thing is reason in competition with inclination.

0

The world is like a board with holes in it, and the square men have got into the round holes, and the round into the square.

0

God is a being of transcendent and unlimited perfections: his nature therefore is incomprehensible to finite spirits.

0

He who says there is no such thing as an honest man, you may be sure is himself a knave.

0

But, say you, surely there is nothing easier than for me to imagine trees, for instance, in a park [. . .] and nobody by to perceive them. [...] The objects of sense exist only when they are perceived; the trees therefore are in the garden [. . .] no longer than while there is somebody by to perceive them.

0

All that stock of arguments [the skeptics] produce to depreciate our faculties, and make mankind appear ignorant and low, are drawn principally from this head, to wit, that we are under an invincible blindness as to the true and real nature of things.

0

All men have opinions, but few think.

0

Many things, for aught I know, may exist, whereof neither I nor any other man hath or can have any idea or notion whatsoever.

0

I do not deny the existence of material substance merely because I have no notion of it, but because the notion of it is inconsistent, or in other words, because it is repugnant that there should be a notion of it.

0

A ray of imagination or of wisdom may enlighten the universe, and glow into remotest centuries.

0

The table I write on I say exists ... meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.

0

In short, if there were external bodies, it is impossible we should ever come to know it; and if there were not, we might have the very same reasons to think there were that we have now.

0

Religion is the centre which unites, and the cement which connects the several parts of members of the political body.

0

To be a good patriot, a man must consider his countrymen as God's creatures, and himself as accountable for his acting towards them.

0

Westward the course of empire takes its way;

The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day: Time's noblest offspring is the last.

0

The real essence, the internal qualities, and constitution of even the meanest object, is hid from our view; something there is inevery drop of water, every grain of sand, which it is beyond the power of human understanding to fathom or comprehend. But it is evidentthat we are influenced by false principles to that degree as to mistrust our senses, and think we know nothing of those things which we perfectly comprehend.

0

The love of truth, virtue, and the happiness of mankind are specious pretexts, but not the inward principles that set divines at work; else why should they affect to abuse human reason, to disparage natural religion, to traduce the philosophers as they universally do?

0

This perceiving, active being is what I call mind, spirit, soul, or myself.

By which words I do not denote any one of my ideas, but a thing entirely distinct from them, wherein they exist, or, which is the same thing, whereby they are perceived; for the existence of an idea consists in being perceived.

0

That neither our thoughts, nor passions, nor ideas formed by the imagination, exist without the mind, is what every body will allow.

0

That the discovery of this great truth, which lies so near and obvious to the mind, should be attained to by the reason of so veryfew, is a sad instance of the stupidity and inattention of men, who, though they are surrounded with such clear manifestations of the Deity, are yet so little affected by them, that they seem as it were blinded with excess of light.

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