The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

— Edmund Burke

The most scandalous Edmund Burke quotes that will activate your desire to change

Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could do only a little.

144

The hottest fires in hell are reserved for those who remain neutral in times of moral crisis.

132

Silence is golden but when it threatens your freedom it's yellow.

127
Edmund Burke quote Our minds can be convinced, but our hear

Our minds can be convinced, but our hearts must be won.

19

Those who have been once intoxicated with power, and have derived any kind of emolument from it, even though but for one year, never can willingly abandon it. They may be distressed in the midst of all their power; but they will never look to anything but power for their relief.

108

It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for its welfare.

90

Mere parsimony is not economy. Expense, and great expense, may be an essential part in true economy.

86
Edmund Burke quote The only thing necessary for evil to tri

The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing. When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.

9

When you fear something, learn as much about it as you can. Knowledge conquers fear.

81

Hypocrisy can afford to be magnificent in its promises, for never intending to go beyond promise, it costs nothing.

77

The greater the power, the more dangerous the abuse.

73

The Fate of good men who refuse to become involved in politics is to be ruled by evil men.

73

To make us love our country, our country ought to be lovely.

67

He that struggles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill.

Our antagonist is our helper.

66

About Edmund Burke

Quotes 494 sayings
Nationality Irish
Profession Statesman
Birthday January 12, 1729

History is a pact between the dead, the living, and the yet unborn.

66

But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever.

65

To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting.

64

Passion for fame: A passion which is the instinct of all great souls.

59

Nothing turns out to be so oppressive and unjust as a feeble government.

57

Men are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites.

53

Old religious factions are volcanoes burned out;

on the lava and ashes and squalid scoriae of old eruptions grow the peaceful olive, the cheering vine and the sustaining corn.

52

But what is liberty without wisdom, and without virtue? It is the greatest of all possible evils; for it is folly, vice, and madness, without tuition or restraint.

49

I dread our own power, and our own ambition;

I dread our being too much dreaded... We may say that we shall not abuse this astonishing, and hitherto unheard-of-power. But every other nation will think we shall abuse it. It is impossible but that, sooner or later, this state of things must produce a combination against us which may end in our ruin.

48

I cannot help concurring with the opinion that an absolute democracy, no more than absolute monarchy, is to be reckoned among the legitimate forms of government.

48

There is but one law for all, namely that law which governs all law, the law of our Creator, the law of humanity, justice, equity - the law of nature and of nations.

44

Despots govern by terror. They know that he who fears God fears nothing else; and therefore they eradicate from the mind, through their Voltaire, their Helvetius, and the rest of that infamous gang, that only sort of fear which generates true courage.

44

Superstition is the religion of feeble minds.

41

There is no safety for honest men, but by believing all possible evil of evil men, and by acting with promptitude, decision, and steadiness on that belief.

40

The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.

39

People must be taken as they are, and we should never try make them or ourselves better by quarreling with them.

36

Our patience will achieve more than our force.

35

All that is necessary for evil to succeed is for good men to do nothing as they must if they believe they can do nothing. There is nothing worse because the council of despair is declaration of irresponsibility; it is Pilate washing his hands.

31

No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.

31

Among a people generally corrupt, liberty cannot long exist.

30

The first and simplest emotion which we discover in the human mind, is curiosity.

27

All men have equal rights, but not to equal things.

25

The true danger is when liberty is nibbled away, for expedience, and by parts.

25

You can never plan the future by the past.

24

Whenever a separation is made between liberty and justice, neither, in my opinion, is safe.

22

A great empire and little minds go ill together.

22

A State without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation.

22

Society can overlook murder, adultery or swindling; it never forgives preaching of a new gospel.

21

All government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue, and every prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter.

21

There is a boundary to men's passions when they act from feelings;

but none when they are under the influence of imagination.

21

History consists, for the greater part, of the miseries brought upon the world by pride, ambition, avarice, revenge, lust, sedition, hypocrisy, ungoverned zeal, and all the train of disorderly appetite.

20

In history, a great volume is unrolled for our instruction, drawing the materials of future wisdom from the past errors and infirmities of mankind.

20

The arrogance of age must submit to be taught by youth.

20

Good order is the foundation of all things.

19

The religion most prevalent in our northern colonies is a refinement on the principles of resistance: it is the dissidence of dissent, and the protestantism of the Protestant religion.

18

And having looked to Government for bread, on the very first scarcity they will turn and bite the hand that fed them.

18

We must all obey the great law of change. It is the most powerful law of nature.

18
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