Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him.

John Locke on begins
69

Parents wonder why the streams are bitter, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain.

John Locke on parenting
18

We are like chameleons, we take our hue and the color of our moral character, from those who are around us.

John Locke on leadership
14

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.

John Locke on education
12

Logic is the anatomy of thought.

John Locke on logic
10

No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience.

John Locke on experience
8

Reading furnishes the mind only with material for knowledge;

it is thinking that makes what we read ours.

John Locke on reading
8

Where there is no property there is no injustice.

John Locke on property
5

The discipline of desire is the background of character.

John Locke on desires
5

There cannot be greater rudeness than to interrupt another in the current of his discourse.

John Locke on communication
5

Every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has a right to, but himself.

John Locke on respect
5

To give a man full knowledge of morality, I would send him to no other book than the New Testament.

John Locke on morals
5

About John Locke

Name John Locke
Quotes 53 quotations
Nationality English
Profession Philosopher
Birthday October 16
About  John Locke was an English philosopher. Locke is considered the first of the British Empiricists, but is equally important to social contract theory. His ideas had enormous influence on the development of epistemology and political philosophy, and he is widely regarded as one of the most influential Enlightenment thinkers and contributors to liberal theory.
Top topics mind, truth, property, world, reading

I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.

John Locke on thought
4

The visible mark of extraordinary wisdom and power appear so plainly in all the works of creation.

John Locke on miracles
4

Things of this world are in so constant a flux, that nothing remains long in the same state.

John Locke on constant
3

Reverie is when ideas float in our mind without reflection or regard of the understanding.

John Locke on dreams
3

All wealth is the product of labor.

John Locke on labor
3

To love our neighbor as ourselves is such a truth for regulating human society, that by that alone one might determine all the cases in social morality.

John Locke on neighbors
3

Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge;

it is thinking that makes what we read ours.

John Locke on knowledge
2

To prejudge other men's notions before we have looked into them is not to show their darkness but to put out our own eyes.

John Locke on darkness
2

Fashion for the most part is nothing but the ostentation of riches.

John Locke on fashion
2

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.

John Locke on opinion
2

Fortitude is the guard and support of the other virtues.

John Locke on virtue
2

It is easier for a tutor to command than to teach.

John Locke on teaching
1

All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it.

John Locke on error
1

Our incomes are like our shoes; if too small, they gall and pinch us; but if too large, they cause us to stumble and to trip.

John Locke on finance
1

Government has no other end, but the preservation of property.

John Locke on government
1

We should have a great fewer disputes in the world if words were taken for what they are, the signs of our ideas only, and not for things themselves.

John Locke on disputes
1

An excellent man, like precious metal, is in every way invariable;

A villain, like the beams of a balance, is always varying, upwards and downwards.

John Locke on balance
1

Good and evil, reward and punishment, are the only motives to a rational creature: these are the spur and reins whereby all mankind are set on work, and guided.

John Locke on humanity
1

Where all is but dream, reasoning and arguments are of no use, truth and knowledge nothing.

John Locke on dream
0

The improvement of understanding is for two ends: first, our own increase of knowledge; secondly, to enable us to deliver that knowledge to others.

John Locke on understanding
0

A sound mind in a sound body, is a short, but full description of a happy state in this World: he that has these two, has little more to wish for; and he that wants either of them, will be little the better for anything else.

John Locke on contentment
0

Freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society, and made by the legislative power vested in it; a liberty to follow my own will in all things, when the rule prescribes not, and not to be subject to the inconstant, unknown, arbitrary will of another man.

John Locke on government
0

One unerring mark of the love of truth is not entertaining any proposition with greater assurance than the proofs it is built upon will warrant.

John Locke on truth
0

It is of great use to the sailor to know the length of his line, though he cannot with it fathom all the depths of the ocean.

John Locke on depths
0

Nihil est in intellectu quod non fuit prius in sensu:Nothing is in the understanding, which was not first perceived by some of the senses.

John Locke on perception
0

What worries you, masters you.

John Locke on masters
0

Vague and mysterious forms of speech, and abuse of language, have so long passed for mysteries of science; and hard or misapplied words with little or no meaning have, by prescription, such a right to be mistaken for deep learning and height of speculation, that it will not be easy to persuade either those who speak or those who hear them, that they are but the covers of ignorance and hindrance of true knowledge.

John Locke on knowledge
0

It is reported of that prodigy of parts, Monsieur Pascal, that till the decay of his health had impaired his memory, he forgot nothing of what he had done, read, or thought, in any part of his rational age. This is a privilege so little known to most men, that it seems almost incredible to those who, after the ordinary way, measure all others by themselves; but yet, when considered, may help us to enlarge our thoughts towards greater perfections of it, in superior ranks of spirits.

John Locke on mind
0

I attribute the little I know to my not having been ashamed to ask for information, and to my rule of conversing with all descriptions of men on those topics that form their own peculiar professions and pursuits.

John Locke on questions
0

The dread of evil is a much more forcible principle of human actions than the prospect of good.

John Locke on evil
0

Any one reflecting upon the thought he has of the delight, which any present or absent thing is apt to produce in him, has the idea we call love.

John Locke on absent
0

Till a man can judge whether they be truths or not, his understanding is but little improved, and thus men of much reading, though greatly learned, but may be little knowing.

John Locke on learning
0

Practice conquers the habit of doing, without reflecting on the rule.

John Locke on habits
0

It is one thing to show a man that he is in an error, and another to put him in possession of the truth.

John Locke on truth
0

All mankind... being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions.

John Locke on equal
0

Had the King of Spain employed the hands of his people, and his Spanish iron so, he had brought to light but little of that treasure that lay so long hid in the dark entrails of America.

John Locke on america
0

There is frequently more to be learned from the unexpected questions of a child than the discourses of men.

John Locke on child
0

The Bible is one of the greatest blessings bestowed by God on the children of men. It has God for its author; salvation for its end, and truth without any mixture for its matter. It is all pure.

John Locke on god
0