Beauty in things exists in the mind which contemplates them.

โ€” David Hume

The most famous David Hume quotes that are guaranted to improve your brain

There is no such thing as freedom of choice unless there is freedom to refuse.

184

Nothing is more surprising than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few.

155

When men are the most sure and arrogant they are commonly the most mistaken, giving views to passion without that proper deliberation and suspense which alone can secure them from the grossest absurdities.

117

If God is omnipotent, omniscient and wholly good, whence evil? If God wills to prevent evil but cannot, then He is not omnipotent. If He can prevent evil but does not, then he is not good. In either case he is not God.

102

Nothing appears more surprising to those, who consider human affairs with a philosophical eye, than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few; and the implicit submission, with which men resign their own sentiments and passions to those of their rulers.

89

Eloquence, at its highest pitch, leaves little room for reason or reflection, but addresses itself entirely to the desires and affections, captivating the willing hearers, and subduing their understanding.

80

All knowledge degenerates into probability.

75

Mohammed praises [instances of] tretchery, inhumanity, cruelty, revenge, and bigotry that are utterly incompatible with civilized society.

65

In all ages of the world, priests have been enemies of liberty.

59

No quality of human nature is more remarkable, both in itself and in its consequences, than that propensity we have to sympathize with others, and to receive by communication their inclinations and sentiments, however different from, or even contrary to our own.

59

No amount of observations of white swans can allow the inference that all swans are white, but the observation of a single black swan is sufficient to refute that conclusion.

54

He is happy whom circumstances suit his temper; but he Is more excellent who suits his temper to any circumstance.

52

About David Hume

Quotes 334 sayings
Nationality Scottish
Profession Philosopher
Birthday October 16

The mind is a kind of theater, where several perceptions successively make their appearence; pass, re-pass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations.

46

Reading and sauntering and lounging and dosing, which I call thinking, is my supreme Happiness.

39

The Crusades - the most signal and most durable monument of human folly that has yet appeared in any age or nation.

33

All power, even the most despotic, rests ultimately on opinion.

32

Human happiness seems to consist in three ingredients: action, pleasure and indolence.

30

Belief is nothing but a more vivid, lively, forcible, firm, steady conception of an object, than what the imagination alone is ever able to attain.

27

When men are most sure and arrogant they are commonly most mistaken.

25

Eloquence, when in its highest pitch, leaves little room for reason or reflection.

24

The corruption of the best things gives rise to the worst.

24

Of all the animals with which this globe is peopled, there is none towards whom nature seems, at first sight, to have exercised more cruelty than towards man, in the numberless wants and necessities with which she has loaded him, and in the slender means which she affords to the relieving these necessities.

23

Examine the religious principles which have, in fact, prevailed in the world.

You will scarcely be persuaded that they are other than sick men's dreams.

22

That the sun will not rise tomorrow is no less intelligible a proposition, and implies no more contradiction, than the affirmation, that it will rise.

20

The Christian religion not only was at first attended with miracles, but even at this day cannot be believed by any reasonable person without one.

20

What a peculiar privilege has this little agitation of the brain which we call 'thought'.

19

No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish.

18

If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number? No. Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence? No. Commit it then to the flames: for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.

18

The heights of popularity and patriotism are still the beaten road to power and tyranny; flattery to treachery; standing armies to arbitrary government; and the glory of God to the temporal interest of the clergy.

17

Heroism, or military glory, is much admired by the generality of mankind.

They consider it as the most sublime kind of merit. Menof cool reflection are not so sanguine in their praises of it.

16

Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions.

16

Weakness, fear, melancholy, together with ignorance, are the true sources of superstition. Hope, pride, presumption, a warm indignation, together with ignorance, are the true sources of enthusiasm.

15

Enthusiasm, being the infirmity of bold and ambitious tempers, is naturally accompanied with a spirit of liberty; as superstition,on the contrary, renders men tame and abject, and fits them for slavery.

14

Liberty of thinking, and of expressing our thoughts, is always fatal to priestly power, and to those pious frauds on which it is commonly founded.

14

The identity that we ascribe to things is only a fictitious one, established by the mind, not a peculiar nature belonging to what weโ€™re talking about.

13

Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous.

12

I am apt to suspect the Negroes to be naturally inferior to the Whites.

There scarcely ever was a civilization of their complexion, nor even any individual, eminent either in action or speculation.

12

Human happiness seems to consist in three ingredients;

action, pleasure and indolence. And though these ingredients ought to be mixed in different proportions, according to the disposition of the person, yet no one ingredient can be entirely wanting without destroying in some measure the relish of the whole composition. composition.

12

It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once.

12

Berkeley , Hume, Kant , Fichte , Hegel , James , Bergson all are united in one earnest attempt, the attempt to reinstate man with his high spiritual claims in a place of importance in the cosmic scheme.

11

Nothing is so improving to the temper as the study of the beauties either of poetry, eloquence, music, or painting.

11

In a vain man, the smallest spark may kindle into the greatest flame, because the materials are always prepared for it.

11

This avidity alone, of acquiring goods and possessions for ourselves and our nearest friends, is insatiable, perpetual, universal, and directly destructive of society.

10

No truth appears to me more evident than that beasts are endowed with thought and reason as well as men.

10

What we call a mind is nothing but a heap or collection of different perceptions, united together by certain relations and supposed, though falsely, to be endowed with a perfect simplicity and identity.

10

Of all sciences there is none where first appearances are more deceitful than in politics.

10

The richest genius, like the most fertile soil, when uncultivated, shoots up into the rankest weeds.

9

It is harder to avoid censure than to gain applause.

9

Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty.

9
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