Every present state of a simple substance is the natural consequence of its preceding state, in such a way that its present is big with its future.

— Gottfried Leibniz

The most attractive Gottfried Leibniz quotes that are new and everybody is talking about

The greatness of a life can only be estimated by the multitude of its actions.

We should not count the years, it is our actions which constitute our life.

52

Music is a hidden arithmetic exercise of the soul, which does not know that it is counting.

52

Music is the pleasure the human mind experiences from counting without being aware that it is counting.

48

Imaginary numbers are a fine and wonderful refuge of the divine spirit almost an amphibian between being and non-being.

37

We may say, that not only the soul (the mirror of an indestructible universe) is indestructible, but also the animal itself is, although its mechanism is frequently destroyed in parts.

37

The present is saturated with the past and pregnant with the future.

35

The words 'Here you can find perfect peace' can be written only over the gates of a cemetery.

28

The world is not a machine. Everything in it is force, life, thought.

25

[Alternate translation:] The Divine Spirit found a sublime outlet in that wonder of analysis, that portent of the ideal world, that amphibian between being and not-being, which we call the imaginary root of negative unity.

14

It is God who is the ultimate reason things, and the Knowledge of God is no less the beginning of science than his essence and will are the beginning of things.

14

Reality cannot be found except in One single source, because of the interconnection of all things with one another.

14

Taking mathematics from the beginning of the world to the time when Newton lived, what he had done was much the better half.

13

About Gottfried Leibniz

Quotes 122 sayings
Nationality German
Profession Philosopher
Birthday October 16

The art of discovering the causes of phenomena, or true hypotheses, is like the art of deciphering, in which an ingenious conjecture often greatly shortens the road.

12

We live in the best of all possible worlds

12

The most perfect society is that whose purpose is the universal and supreme happiness.

10

I have said more than once, that I hold space to be something purely relative, as time; an order of coexistences, as time is an order of successions.

10

Every substance is as a world apart, independent of everything else except God.

9

In my judgment an organic machine new to nature never arises, since it always contains an infinity of organs so that it can express, in its own way, the whole universe; indeed, it always contains all past and present times.

8

God makes nothing without order, and everything that forms itself develops imperceptibly out of small parts.

8

The pleasure we obtain from music comes from counting, but counting unconsciously. Music is nothing but unconscious arithmetic.

7

There never is absolute birth nor complete death, in the strict sense, consisting in the separation of the soul from the body. What we call births are developments and growths, while what we call deaths are envelopments and diminutions.

7

When God works miracles, he does not do it in order to supply the wants of nature, but those of grace. Whoever thinks otherwise, must needs have a very mean notion of the wisdom and power of God.

7

...a distinction must be made between true and false ideas, and that too much rein must not be given to a man's imagination under pretext of its being a clear and distinct intellection.

6

He who hasn't tasted bitter things hasn't earned sweet things.

4

Men act like brutes in so far as the sequences of their perceptions arise through the principle of memory only, like those empirical physicians who have mere practice without theory.

4

We should like Nature to go no further;

we should like it to be finite, like our mind; but this is to ignore the greatness and majesty of the Author of things.

4

It is worth noting that the notation facilitates discovery.

This, in a most wonderful way, reduces the mind's labour.

4

It is unworthy of excellent men to lose hours like slaves in the labor of calculation which could be relegated to anyone else if machines were used.

4

Nothing is accomplished all at once, and it is one of my great maxims, and one of the most completely verified, that Nature makes no leaps: a maxim which I have called the law of continuity.

4

Whence it follows that God is absolutely perfect, since perfection is nothing but magnitude of positive reality, in the strict sense, setting aside the limits or bounds in things which are limited.

3

I am convinced that the unwritten knowledge scattered among men of different callings surpasses in quantity and in importance anything we find in books, and that the greater part of our wealth has yet to be recorded.

3

It has long seemed ridiculous to me to suppose that the nature of things has been so poor and stingy that it provided souls only to such a trifling mass of bodies on our globe, like human bodies, when it could have given them to all, without interfering with its other ends.

3

Each portion of matter may be conceived of as a garden full of plants, and as a pond full of fishes. But each branch of the plant, each member of the animal, each drop of its humors, is also such a garden or such a pond.

3

The dot was introduced as a symbol for multiplication by Leibniz.

On July 29, 1698, he wrote in a letter to Johann Bernoulli: "I do not like X as a symbol for multiplication, as it is easily confounded with x.

3

Indeed every monad must be different from every other.

For there are never in nature two beings, which are precisely alike, and in which it is not possible to find some difference which is internal, or based on some intrinsic quality.

3

It follows from what we have just said, that the natural changes of monads come from an internal principle, since an external cause would be unable to influence their inner being.

2

Music is a secret and unconscious mathematical problem of the soul.

2

I do not conceive of any reality at all as without genuine unity.

2

Music is nothing but unconscious arithmetic.

2

To love is to take delight in happiness of another, or, what amounts to the same thing, it is to account another's happiness as one's own.

2

When a truth is necessary, the reason for it can be found by analysis, that is, by resolving it into simpler ideas and truths until the primary ones are reached.

1

I also take it as granted that every created thing, and consequently the created monad also, is subject to change, and indeed that this change is continual in each one.

1

For since it is impossible for a created monad to have a physical influence on the inner nature of another, this is the only way in which one can be dependent on another.

1

Let there be two possible things, A and B, one of which is such that it is necessary that it exists, and let us assume that there is more perfection in A than in B. Then, at least, we can explain why A should exist rather than B and can foresee which of them will exist; indeed, this can be demonstrated, that is, rendered certain from the nature of the thing.

0

All things in God are spontaneous.

0

There is a certain destiny of everything, regulated by the foreknowledge and providence of God in His works.

0

There is nothing without reason.

0

The monad, of which we shall speak here, is nothing but a simple substance which enters into compounds; simple, that is to say, without parts.

0

In symbols one observes an advantage in discovery which is greatest when they express the exact nature of a thing briefly and, as it were, picture it; then indeed the labor of thought is wonderfully diminished.

0
famous quotes