Best quotes by the British Writer Jane Austen

In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels.
  • Love

There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.
  • Shyness

The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.
  • aliteracy

Why not seize the pleasure at once? How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation.
  • Opportunity



My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.
  • clever

Every man is surrounded by a neighborhood of voluntary spies.
  • Neighbors

Those who do not complain are never pitied.
  • Pessimism

I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle.
  • Selfishness

Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced and the inconvenience is often considerable.
  • Surprise

What strange creatures brothers are!
  • brothers

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.
  • love

We do not look in our great cities for our best morality.
  • City

A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.
  • Fortune

It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage.
  • Marriage

What is right to be done cannot be done too soon.
  • done

How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!
  • approving

I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.
  • agreeable

What are men to rocks and mountains?
  • mountains

You deserve a longer letter than this; but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve.
  • austen

Business, you know, may bring you money, but friendship hardly ever does.
  • Money

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?
  • Neighbors

One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.
  • Pleasure

From politics it was an easy step to silence.
  • Silence

What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance.
  • Weather

To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.
  • certain

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.
  • humor

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.
  • Humility

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.
  • Marriage

Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.
  • Optimism

Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.
  • Sympathy


Pictures quotes by Jane Austen

Go to table of contents

Jane Austen Quotes About

Go to table of contents

Jane Austen austen quotes

Go to table of contents
You deserve a longer letter than this; but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve.
  • austen

Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
  • jane

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.
  • elizabeth

Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.
  • comfort

[I]t is well to have as many holds upon happiness as possible.
  • happiness

Angry people are not always wise.
  • anger

Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all.
  • humor

More austen quotes


Jane Austen jane quotes

Go to table of contents
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
  • jane

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.
  • elizabeth

Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.
  • comfort

[I]t is well to have as many holds upon happiness as possible.
  • happiness

Angry people are not always wise.
  • anger

Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all.
  • humor

More jane quotes


Jane Austen love quotes

Go to table of contents
In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels.
  • Love

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.
  • love

To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.
  • certain

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.
  • humor

The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!
  • love

More love quotes


Jane Austen books quotes

Go to table of contents
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.
  • aliteracy

Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.
  • advantage

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
  • books

It is only a novel... or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language
  • books

More books quotes


Jane Austen humor quotes

Go to table of contents
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.
  • aliteracy

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.
  • humor

[I]t is well to have as many holds upon happiness as possible.
  • happiness

Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all.
  • humor

More humor quotes


More quotes by Jane Austen

Go to table of contents
I am afraid that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.
  • Work

Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken.
  • belong

There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.
  • home

Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
  • jane



He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman's daughter. So far we are equal.
  • feminism

You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. I have heard you mention them with consideration these twenty years at least.
  • Fear

With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works.
  • Men

There are certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world as there are of pretty woman to deserve them.
  • Men

A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.
  • Money

To sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.
  • Nature

One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.
  • Ridicule

One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.
  • Travel

Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor. Which is one very strong argument in favor of matrimony.
  • Women

Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being.
  • being

Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.
  • advantage

Nobody minds having what is too good for them.
  • minds

They are much to be pitied who have not been given a taste for nature early in life.
  • early

Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.
  • considerable

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
  • acknowledged

There are certainly not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them.
  • certainly

Elinor agreed with it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.
  • agreement

Although our productions have afforded more extensive and unaffected pleasure than those of any other literary corporation in the world, no species of composition has been so much decried. And what are you reading, Miss -- -? Oh! it is only a novel! replies the young lady; while she lays down her book with affected indifference, or momentary shame. It is only Cecilia, or Camilla, or Belinda ; or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humor, are conveyed to the world in the best chosen language.
  • Authors

I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding
  • Authors

One has not great hopes from Birmingham. I always say there is something direful in the sound.
  • City

It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind; but when a beginning is made -- when the felicities of rapid motion have once been, though slightly, felt -- it must be a very heavy set that does not ask for more.
  • Dance

. . . it is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are the result of previous study?
  • Flattery

Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure of being kindly spoken of.
  • Judging

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
  • Literary

And I, Mr. Knightley, am equally stout in my confidence of its not doing them any harm. With all dear Emma's little faults, she is an excellent creature. Where shall we see a better daughter, or a kinder sister, or a truer friend? No, no; she has qualities which may be trusted; she will never lead any one really wrong; she will make no lasting blunder; where Emma errs once, she is in the right a hundred times.
  • Loyalty

An engaged woman is always more agreeable than a disengaged. She is satisfied with herself. Her cares are over, and she feels that she may exert all her powers of pleasing without suspicion. All is safe with a lady engaged; no harm can be done.
  • Marriage

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters.
  • Men

Where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.
  • Opinion

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
  • Reading

It is indolence... Indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen. A clergyman has nothing to do but be slovenly and selfish; read the newspaper, watch the weather, and quarrel with his wife. His curate does all the work and the business of his own life is to dine.
  • Religion

It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.
  • Religion

To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain for the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.
  • Women

To sit in the shade on a fine day and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.
  • nature

From politics, it was an easy step to silence.
  • politics

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn?
  • laugh

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves; vanity, to what we would have others think of us.
  • being

Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.
  • busy

Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.
  • deception

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.
  • elizabeth

From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.
  • antipathy

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
  • books

A man does not recover from such devotion of the heart to such a woman! He ought not; he does not.
  • amour

They gave themselves up wholly to their sorrow, seeking increase of wretchedness in every reflection that could afford it, and resolved against ever admitting consolation in future.
  • amour

It is only a novel... or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language
  • books

You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.
  • elizabeth

Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.
  • comfort

It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of a man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire... Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter.
  • fashion

The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!
  • love

A woman, especially if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.
  • knowledge

[I]t is well to have as many holds upon happiness as possible.
  • happiness

Angry people are not always wise.
  • anger

Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all.
  • humor

Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint!
  • advice

Reflection must be reserved for solitary hours; whenever she was alone, she gave way to it as the greatest relief; and not a day went by without a solitary walk, in which she might indulge in all the delight of unpleasant recollections.
  • reflection

Ah! There is nothing like staying at home, for real comfort.
  • relaxation

Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.
  • education

I am excessively diverted.
  • elizabeth


Writer similar to Jane Austen


Go to table of contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part 1
Best Jane Austen quotes

Part 2
Jane Austen pictures quotes

Part 3
Jane Austen's Quotes About ...
Austen
Jane
Love
Books
Humor
All Jane Austen quotes

Part 4
Quotes by authors similar to Jane Austen

Quote
Loading ...