Respect for ourselves guides our morals, respect for others guides our manners.

— Laurence Sterne

The most exciting Laurence Sterne quotes that will be huge advantage for your personal development

A good simile,--as concise as a king's declaration of love.

63

When my way is too rough for my feet, or too steep for my strength, I get off it to some smooth velvet path which fancy has scattered over with rosebuds of delights; and, having taken a few turns in it, come back strengthened and refreshed.

52

I take a simple view of life. It is keep your eyes open and get on with it.

48

Men tire themselves in pursuit of rest.

39

Only the brave know how to forgive... a coward never forgave; it is not in his nature.

22

The desire of knowledge, like the thirst of riches, increases ever with the acquisition of it.

22

There is nothing so awkward as courting a woman whilst she is making sausages.

19

In solitude the mind gains strength and learns to lean upon itself.

17

Keyholes are the occasions of more sin and wickedness, than all other holes in this world put together.

15

Pain and pleasure, like light and darkness, succeed each other.

14

Freethinkers are generally those who never think at all.

14

In solitude the mind gains strength, and learns to lean upon herself;

in the world it seeks or accepts of a few treacherous supports--the feigned compassion of one, the flattery of a second, the civilities of a third, the friendship of a fourth--they all deceive, and bring the mind back to retirement, reflection, and books.

14

About Laurence Sterne

Quotes 210 sayings
Nationality Irish
Profession Novelist
Birthday October 16

Every obstruction of the course of justice,--is a door opened to betray society, and bereave us of those blessings which it has inview.... It is a strange way of doing honour to God, to screen actions which are a disgrace to humanity.

13

The happiness of life may be greatly increased by small courtesies in which there is no parade, whose voice is too still to tease, and which manifest themselves by tender and affectionate looks, and little kind acts of attention.

12

Only the brave know how to forgive; it is the most refined and generous pitch of virtue human nature can arrive at.

12

People who overly take care of their health are like misers.

They hoard up a treasure which they never enjoy.

11

All womankind, from the highest to the lowest love jokes;

the difficulty is to know how they choose to have them cut; and there is no knowing that, but by trying, as we do with our artillery in the field, by raising or letting down their breeches, till we hit the mark.

10

A large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life, by him who interests his heart in everything.

10

Simplicity is the great friend to nature, and if I would be proud of anything in this silly world, it should be of this honest alliance.

9

Solitude is the best nurse of wisdom.

8

There are many ways of inducing sleep--the thinking of purling rills, or waving woods; reckoning of numbers; droppings from a wet sponge fixed over a brass pan, etc. But temperance and exercise answer much better than any of these succedaneums.

7

The history of a soldier's wound beguiles the pain of it.

6

Nothing is so perfectly amusing as a total change of ideas.

6

Every thing in this world, said my father, is big with jest,--and has wit in it, and instruction too,--if we can but find it out.

6

An inward sincerity will of course influence the outward deportment;

but where the one is wanting, there is great reason to suspect the absence of the other.

5

It appears an extraordinary thing to me, that since there is such a diabolical spirit in the depravity of human nature, as persecution for difference of opinion in religious tenets, there never happened to be any inquisition, any auto da fe, any crusade, among the Pagans.

5

What is the life of man! Is it not to shift from side to side? From sorrow to sorrow? To button up one cause of vexation! And unbutton another!

5

The most accomplished way of using books is to serve them as some people do lords; learn their titles and then brag of their acquaintance.

4

In all unmerciful actions, the worst of men pay this compliment at least to humanity, as to endeavour to wear as much of the appearance of it, as the case will well let them.

4

The brave only know how to forgive.

4

Precedents are the disgrace of legislation.

They are not wanted to justify right measures, are absolutely insufficient to excuse wrong ones. They can only be useful to heralds, dancing masters, and gentlemen ushers.

4

For every ten jokes you acquire a hundred enemies.

4

Alas! if the principles of contentment are not within us, the height of station and worldly grandeur will as soon add a cubit to a man's stature as to his happiness.

4

There have been no sects in the Christian world, however absurd, which have not endeavoured to support their opinions by arguments drawn from Scripture.

4

There is no such thing as real happiness in life.

The justest definition that was ever given of it was "a tranquil acquiescence under an agreeable delusion"--I forget where.

4

Writing, when properly managed, (as you may be sure I think mine is) is but a different name for conversation.

4

Chance is the providence of adventurers.

4

The insolence of base minds in success is boundless;

and would scarce admit of a comparison, did not they themselves furnish us with one in the degrees of their abjection when evil returns upon them.

4

Look into the world

4

Courtship consists in a number of quiet attentions, not so pointed as to alarm, nor so vague as not to be understood.

4

Religion which lays so many restraints upon us, is a troublesome companion to those who will lay no restraints upon themselves.

4

Our passion and principals are constantly in a frenzy, but begin to shift and waver, as we return to reason.

4

It is a great pity but tis certain from every day's observation of man, that he may be set on fire like a candle, at either end provided there is a sufficient wick standing out.

4

Lessons of wisdom have the most power over us when they capture the heart through the groundwork of a story, which engages the passions.

4

The sad vicissitude of things.

3

I never drink. I cannot do it, on equal terms with others. It costs them only one day; but me three, the first in sinning, the second in suffering, and the third in repenting.

3

Any one may do a casual act of good-nature;

but a continuation of them shows it a part of the temperament.

3

The most affluent may be stripped of all, and find his worldly comforts, like so many withered leaves, dropping from him.

3

Patience cannot remove, but it can always dignify and alleviate, misfortune.

3
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