Best quotes by the English Poet Lord (George Gordon) Byron

The heart will break, but broken live on.
  • Heart

The great art of life is sensation, to feel that we exist, even in pain.
  • Pain

There is no instinct like that of the heart.
  • Intuition

I have great hopes that we shall love each other all our lives as much as if we had never married at all.
  • Marriage



Adversity is the first path to truth.
  • Adversity

Like the measles, love is most dangerous when it comes late in life.
  • Love

To withdraw myself from myself has ever been my sole, my entire, my sincere motive in scribbling at all.
  • Authors

If I am fool, it is, at least, a doubting one; and I envy no one the certainty of his self-approved wisdom.
  • Doubt

To have joy one must share it. Happiness was born a twin.
  • Happiness

Death, so called, is a thing which makes men weep, and yet a third of life is passed in sleep.
  • Death

A woman who gives any advantage to a man may expect a lover -- but will sooner or later find a tyrant.
  • Men

I would rather have a nod from an American, than a snuff-box from an emperor.
  • America

Our thoughts take the wildest flight: Even at the moment when they should arrange themselves in thoughtful order.
  • Concentration

The drying up a single tear has more of honest fame, than shedding seas of gore.
  • Crying

When we think we lead we are most led.
  • Leadership

The busy have no time for tears.
  • Sadness

In solitude, where we are least alone.
  • Solitude

Truth is always strange, stranger than fiction.
  • Truth

America is a model of force and freedom and moderation -- with all the coarseness and rudeness of its people.
  • America

The poor dog, in life the firmest friend. The first to welcome, foremost to defend.
  • Animals

I stood among them, but not of them; in a shroud of thoughts which were not their thoughts.
  • Dissent

Prolonged endurance tames the bold.
  • Endurance

We are all selfish and I no more trust myself than others with a good motive.
  • Selfishness

All who joy would win must share it. Happiness was born a Twin.
  • Charity

Nothing can confound a wise man more than laughter from a dunce.
  • Laughter

It is very certain that the desire of life prolongs it.
  • Life

The best way will be to avoid each other without appearing to do so -- or if we jostle, at any rate not to bite.
  • Love

Roll on, deep and dark blue ocean, roll. Ten thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain. Man marks the earth with ruin, but his control stops with the shore.
  • Oceans

Out of chaos God made a world, and out of high passions comes a people.
  • Chaos

It is useless to tell one not to reason but to believe --you might as well tell a man not to wake but sleep.
  • Faith


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Lord (George Gordon) Byron Quotes About

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Lord (George Gordon) Byron age quotes

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Thy decay's still impregnate with divinity.
  • Age

Of all the barbarous middle ages, that which is most barbarous is the middle age of man! it is -- I really scarce know what; but when we hover between fool and sage, and don't know justly what we would be at -- a period something like a printed page, black letter upon foolscap, while our hair grows grizzled, and we are not what we were.
  • Age

What is the worst of woes that wait on age? What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow? To view each loved one blotted from life's page, And be alone on earth, as I am now.
  • Age

My time has been passed viciously and agreeably; at thirty-one so few years months days hours or minutes remain that Carpe Diem is not enough. I have been obliged to crop even the seconds -- for who can trust to tomorrow?
  • Age

A lady of a certain age, which means certainly aged.
  • Age

I always looked to about thirty as the barrier of any real or fierce delight in the passions, and determined to work them out in the younger ore and better veins of the mine --and I flatter myself (perhaps) that I have pretty well done so --and now the dross is coming.
  • Age

I shall soon be six-and-twenty. Is there anything in the future that can possibly console us for not being always twenty-five?
  • Age

It was one of the deadliest and heaviest feelings of my life to feel that I was no longer a boy. From that moment I began to grow old in my own esteem --and in my esteem age is not estimable.
  • Age

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Lord (George Gordon) Byron writing quotes

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To withdraw myself from myself has ever been my sole, my entire, my sincere motive in scribbling at all.
  • Authors

Letter writing is the only device for combining solitude with good company.
  • Letters

Romances I never read like those I have seen.
  • Authors

In general I do not draw well with literary men -- not that I dislike them but I never know what to say to them after I have praised their last publication.
  • Authors

But I hate things all fiction... there should always be some foundation of fact for the most airy fabric -- and pure invention is but the talent of a liar.
  • Authors

Nothing so fretful, so despicable as a Scribbler, see what I am, and what a parcel of Scoundrels I have brought about my ears, and what language I have been obliged to treat them with to deal with them in their own way; -- all this comes of Authorship.
  • Authors

If I don't write to empty my mind, I go mad. As to that regular, uninterrupted love of writing. I do not understand it. I feel it as a torture, which I must get rid of, but never as a pleasure. On the contrary, I think composition a great pain.
  • Authors

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Lord (George Gordon) Byron authors quotes

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To withdraw myself from myself has ever been my sole, my entire, my sincere motive in scribbling at all.
  • Authors

Romances I never read like those I have seen.
  • Authors

In general I do not draw well with literary men -- not that I dislike them but I never know what to say to them after I have praised their last publication.
  • Authors

But I hate things all fiction... there should always be some foundation of fact for the most airy fabric -- and pure invention is but the talent of a liar.
  • Authors

Nothing so fretful, so despicable as a Scribbler, see what I am, and what a parcel of Scoundrels I have brought about my ears, and what language I have been obliged to treat them with to deal with them in their own way; -- all this comes of Authorship.
  • Authors

If I don't write to empty my mind, I go mad. As to that regular, uninterrupted love of writing. I do not understand it. I feel it as a torture, which I must get rid of, but never as a pleasure. On the contrary, I think composition a great pain.
  • Authors

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Lord (George Gordon) Byron marriage quotes

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I have great hopes that we shall love each other all our lives as much as if we had never married at all.
  • Marriage

Constancy... that small change of love, which people exact so rigidly, receive in such counterfeit coin, and repay in baser metal.
  • Marriage

I am about to be married, and am of course in all the misery of a man in pursuit of happiness.
  • Marriage

Though women are angels, yet wedlock's the devil.
  • Marriage

The fact is that my wife if she had common sense would have more power over me than any other whatsoever, for my heart always alights upon the nearest perch.
  • Marriage

All tragedies are finished by a death,All comedies are ended by a marriage;The future states of both are left to faith,For authors fear description might disparageThe worlds to come of both. . . .
  • Marriage

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Lord (George Gordon) Byron love quotes

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Like the measles, love is most dangerous when it comes late in life.
  • Love

The best way will be to avoid each other without appearing to do so -- or if we jostle, at any rate not to bite.
  • Love

Who loves, raves.
  • Love

Man's love is of man's life a part; it is a woman's whole existence. In her first passion, a woman loves her lover, in all the others all she loves is love.
  • Love

Lovers may be -- and indeed generally are -- enemies, but they never can be friends, because there must always be a spice of jealousy and a something of Self in all their speculations.
  • Love

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More quotes by Lord (George Gordon) Byron

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Fame is the thirst of youth.
  • Fame

Hatred is the madness of the heart.
  • Hate

Letter writing is the only device for combining solitude with good company.
  • Letters

Who loves, raves.
  • Love



Sorrow is knowledge, those that know the most must mourn the deepest, the tree of knowledge is not the tree of life.
  • Sadness

The power of thought, the magic of the mind.
  • Thought

There's naught, no doubt, so much the spirit calms as rum and true religion.
  • Contentment

There is something pagan in me that I cannot shake off. In short, I deny nothing, but doubt everything.
  • Doubt

Who surpasses or subdues mankind, must look down on the hate of those below.
  • Envy

I awoke one morning and found myself famous.
  • Fame

Though sages may pour out their wisdom's treasure, there is no sterner moralist than pleasure.
  • Morals

Where there is mystery, it is generally suspected there must also be evil.
  • Mystery

I am sure of nothing so little as my own intentions.
  • Purpose

Science is but the exchange of ignorance for that which is another kind of ignorance.
  • Science

Sincerity may be humble, but she cannot be servile.
  • Sincerity

Sleep hath its own world, and a wide realm of wild reality. And dreams in their development have breath, and tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy.
  • Sleep

Society is now one polished horde, formed of two mighty tribes, the Bores and Bored.
  • Society

Thy decay's still impregnate with divinity.
  • Age

Let us have wine and women, mirth and laughter. Sermons and soda water the day after.
  • AlcoholAlcoholism

Think not I am what I appear.
  • Appearance

Romances I never read like those I have seen.
  • Authors

In general I do not draw well with literary men -- not that I dislike them but I never know what to say to them after I have praised their last publication.
  • Authors

I only go out to get me a fresh appetite for being alone.
  • Communism

A man must serve his time to every trade save censure -- critics all are ready made.
  • Criticism

It is very iniquitous to make me pay my debts -- you have no idea of the pain it gives one.
  • Debt

And after all, what is a lie?
  • DeceptionLying

A woman should never be seen eating or drinking, unless it be lobster salad and Champagne, the only true feminine and becoming viands.
  • Food

Friendship is Love without his wings!
  • Friends

Who tracks the steps of glory to the grave?
  • Glory

Sighing that Nature formed but one such man, and broke the die.
  • Greatness

So for a good old-gentlemanly vice, I think I must take up with avarice.
  • Greed

For pleasures past I do not grieve, nor perils gathering near; My greatest grief is that I leave nothing that claims a tear.
  • Inheritance

The dew of compassion is a tear.
  • Kindness

With just enough of learning to misquote.
  • Learning

Life's enchanted cup sparkles near the brim.
  • Life

Constancy... that small change of love, which people exact so rigidly, receive in such counterfeit coin, and repay in baser metal.
  • Marriage

Poetry should only occupy the idle.
  • Poetry

Smiles form the channel of a future tear.
  • Smile

It is odd but agitation or contest of any kind gives a rebound to my spirits and sets me up for a time.
  • Adversity

Man, being reasonable, must get drunk; the best of life is but intoxication.
  • AlcoholAlcoholism

He who surpasses or subdues mankind, must look down on the hate of those below.
  • Ambition

As falls the dew on quenchless sands, blood only serves to wash ambition's hands.
  • Ambition

But I hate things all fiction... there should always be some foundation of fact for the most airy fabric -- and pure invention is but the talent of a liar.
  • Authors

Men are the sport of circumstances when it seems circumstances are the sport of men.
  • Chance

O Gold! I still prefer thee unto paper, which makes bank credit like a bark of vapor.
  • Credit

Critics are already made.
  • Criticism

Oh! too convincing -- dangerously dear -- In woman's eye the unanswerable tear!
  • Crying

Fools are my theme, let satire be my song.
  • Cynicism

A thousand years may scare form a state. An hour may lay it in ruins.
  • Empire

Folly loves the martyrdom of fame.
  • Fame

The mind can make substance, and people planets of its own with beings brighter than have been, and give a breath to forms which can outlive all flesh.
  • Fantasy

The beginning of atonement is the sense of its necessity.
  • Forgiveness

Yet, Freedom! yet thy banner, torn, but flying, streams like the thunderstorm against the wind.
  • Freedom

I cannot help thinking that the menace of Hell makes as many devils as the severe penal codes of inhuman humanity make villains.
  • Hell

History is the devil's scripture.
  • History

And having wisdom with each studious year, in meditation dwelt, with learning wrought, and shaped his weapon with an edge severe, sapping a solemn creed with solemn sneer.
  • History

The place is very well and quiet and the children only scream in a low voice.
  • Home

All farewells should be sudden, when forever.
  • Last

I am about to be married, and am of course in all the misery of a man in pursuit of happiness.
  • Marriage

Though women are angels, yet wedlock's the devil.
  • Marriage

The fact is that my wife if she had common sense would have more power over me than any other whatsoever, for my heart always alights upon the nearest perch.
  • Marriage

What a strange thing man is; and what a stranger thing woman.
  • Men

Switzerland is a curst, selfish, swinish country of brutes, placed in the most romantic region of the world.
  • Nation

In her first passion, a woman loves her lover, in all the others all she loves is love.
  • Passion

From the wreck of the past, which hath perish
  • Past

Though I love my country, I do not love my countrymen.
  • Patriotism

I am always most religious upon a sunshiny day...
  • Religion

The good old times -- all times when old are good.
  • Remembrance

He scratched his ear, the infallible resource to which embarrassed people have recourse.
  • Shame

And the might of the Gentile, unsmote by the sword,Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord!
  • Snow

Oh! snatched away in beauty's bloom, On thee shall press no ponderous tomb; But on thy turf shall roses rear Their leaves, the earliest of the year.
  • Suicide

For in itself a thought, a slumbering thought, is capable of years, and curdles a long life into one hour.
  • Thought

Words are things, and a small drop of ink, falling like dew upon a thought, produces that which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think.
  • Words

No more we meet in yonder bowers Absence has made me prone to roving; But older, firmer hearts than ours, Have found monotony in loving.
  • Absence

My turn of mind is so given to taking things in the absurd point of view, that it breaks out in spite of me every now and then.
  • Absurdity

I am acquainted with no immaterial sensuality so delightful as good acting.
  • Actors

And yet a little tumult, now and then, is an agreeable quickener of sensation; such as a revolution, a battle, or an adventure of any lively description.
  • Adventure

Of all the barbarous middle ages, that which is most barbarous is the middle age of man! it is -- I really scarce know what; but when we hover between fool and sage, and don't know justly what we would be at -- a period something like a printed page, black letter upon foolscap, while our hair grows grizzled, and we are not what we were.
  • Age

What is the worst of woes that wait on age? What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow? To view each loved one blotted from life's page, And be alone on earth, as I am now.
  • Age

My time has been passed viciously and agreeably; at thirty-one so few years months days hours or minutes remain that Carpe Diem is not enough. I have been obliged to crop even the seconds -- for who can trust to tomorrow?
  • Age

A lady of a certain age, which means certainly aged.
  • Age

I always looked to about thirty as the barrier of any real or fierce delight in the passions, and determined to work them out in the younger ore and better veins of the mine --and I flatter myself (perhaps) that I have pretty well done so --and now the dross is coming.
  • Age

I shall soon be six-and-twenty. Is there anything in the future that can possibly console us for not being always twenty-five?
  • Age

It was one of the deadliest and heaviest feelings of my life to feel that I was no longer a boy. From that moment I began to grow old in my own esteem --and in my esteem age is not estimable.
  • Age

The Angels were all singing out of tune, and hoarse with having little else to do, excepting to wind up the sun and moon or curb a runaway young star or two.
  • Angels

Nothing so fretful, so despicable as a Scribbler, see what I am, and what a parcel of Scoundrels I have brought about my ears, and what language I have been obliged to treat them with to deal with them in their own way; -- all this comes of Authorship.
  • Authors

If I don't write to empty my mind, I go mad. As to that regular, uninterrupted love of writing. I do not understand it. I feel it as a torture, which I must get rid of, but never as a pleasure. On the contrary, I think composition a great pain.
  • Authors

All are inclined to believe what they covet, from a lottery-ticket up to a passport to Paradise.
  • Belief

What a strange thing is the propagation of life! A bubble of seed which may be spilt in a whore's lap, or in the orgasm of a voluptuous dream, might (for aught we know) have formed a Caesar or a Bonaparte -- there is nothing remarkable recorded of their sires, that I know of.
  • Birth

Here lies interred in the eternity of the past, from whence there is no resurrection for the days -- whatever there may be for the dust -- the thirty-third year of an ill-spent life, which, after a lingering disease of many months sank into a lethargy, and expired, January 22d, 1821, A.D. leaving a successor inconsolable for the very loss which occasioned its existence.
  • Birthdays

The French courage proceeds from vanity
  • Bravery

The lapse of ages changes all things -- time, language, the earth, the bounds of the sea, the stars of the sky, and every thing about, around, and underneath man, except man himself.
  • Change

I do detest everything which is not perfectly mutual.
  • Charity

I have a great mind to believe in Christianity for the mere pleasure of fancying I may be damned.
  • Christianity

No ear can hear nor tongue can tell the tortures of the inward hell!
  • Conscience

What an antithetical mind! -- tenderness, roughness -- delicacy, coarseness -- sentiment, sensuality -- soaring and groveling, dirt and deity -- all mixed up in that one compound of inspired clay!
  • Contradiction

That low vice, curiosity!
  • Curiosity

For the sword outwears its sheath, and the soul wears out the breast. And the heart must pause to breathe, and love itself have rest.
  • Death

I have seen a thousand graves opened, and always perceived that whatever was gone, the teeth and hair remained of those who had died with them. Is not this odd? They go the very first things in youth and yet last the longest in the dust.
  • Death

For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast,And breathed in the face of the foe as he pass'd;And the eyes of the sleepers wax'd deadly and chill,And their hearts but once heaved, and for ever grew still!
  • Death

Dreading that climax of all human ills the inflammation of his weekly bills.
  • Debt

This place is the Devil, or at least his principal residence, they call it the University, but any other appellation would have suited it much better, for study is the last pursuit of the society; the Master eats, drinks, and sleeps, the Fellows drink, dispute and pun, the employments of the undergraduates you will probably conjecture without my description.
  • Education

Posterity will never survey a nobler grave than this: here lie the bones of Castlereagh: stop, traveler, and piss.
  • Epitaphs

Your letter of excuses has arrived. I receive the letter but do not admit the excuses except in courtesy, as when a man treads on your toes and begs your pardon -- the pardon is granted, but the joint aches, especially if there is a corn upon it.
  • Excuses

My great comfort is, that the temporary celebrity I have wrung from the world has been in the very teeth of all opinions and prejudices. I have flattered no ruling powers; I have never concealed a single thought that tempted me.
  • Fame

I have always believed that all things depended upon Fortune, and nothing upon ourselves.
  • Fate

Tempted fate will leave the loftiest star.
  • Fate

The reason that adulation is not displeasing is that, though untrue, it shows one to be of consequence enough, in one way or other, to induce people to lie.
  • Flattery

A mistress never is nor can be a friend. While you agree, you are lovers; and when it is over, anything but friends.
  • Friends

I have always laid it down as a maxim --and found it justified by experience --that a man and a woman make far better friendships than can exist between two of the same sex --but then with the condition that they never have made or are to make love to each other.
  • Friends

I have had, and may have still, a thousand friends, as they are called, in life, who are like one's partners in the waltz of this world --not much remembered when the ball is over.
  • Friends

I have a notion that gamblers are as happy as most people, being always excited; women, wine, fame, the table, even ambition, sate now and then, but every turn of the card and cast of the dice keeps the gambler alive -- besides one can game ten times longer than one can do any thing else.
  • Gambling

I really cannot know whether I am or am not the Genius you are pleased to call me, but I am very willing to put up with the mistake, if it be one. It is a title dearly enough bought by most men, to render it endurable, even when not quite clearly made out, which it never can be till the Posterity, whose decisions are merely dreams to ourselves, has sanctioned or denied it, while it can touch us no further.
  • Genius

The king-times are fast finishing. There will be blood shed like water, and tears like mist; but the peoples will conquer in the end. I shall not live to see it, but I foresee it.
  • Government

But what is Hope? Nothing but the paint on the face of Existence; the least touch of truth rubs it off, and then we see what a hollow-cheeked harlot we have got hold of.
  • Hope

Man is born passionate of body, but with an innate though secret tendency to the love of Good in his main-spring of Mind. But God help us all! It is at present a sad jar of atoms.
  • Humanity

Keep thy smooth words and juggling homilies for those who know thee not.
  • Hypocrisy

The Cardinal is at his wit's end -- it is true that he had not far to go.
  • Ignorance

If a man proves too clearly and convincingly to himself...that a tiger is an optical illusion--well, he will find out he is wrong. The tiger will himself intervene in the discussion, in a manner which will be in every sense conclusive.
  • Imagination

It has been said that the immortality of the soul is a grand peut-tre --but still it is a grand one. Everybody clings to it --the stupidest, and dullest, and wickedest of human bipeds is still persuaded that he is immortal.
  • Immortality


Poet similar to Lord (George Gordon) Byron


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