Green little vaulter, in the sunny grass, Catching your heart up at the feel of June, Sole noise that's heard amidst the lazy noon, When ev'n the bees lag at the summoning brass.

— Leigh Hunt

The most tremendous Leigh Hunt quotes that are new and everybody is talking about

The groundwork of all happiness is health.

88

We are slumberous poppies, Lords of Lethe downs, Some awake and some asleep, Sleeping in our crowns. What perchance our dreams may know, Let our serious may know.

67

The most tangible of all visible mysteries - fire.

57

Sympathizing and selfish people are alike, both given to tears.

54

Jenny kissed me when we met, Jumping from the chair she sat in;

Time, you thief, who love to get Sweets into your list, put that in: Say I'm weary, say I'm sad, Say that health and wealth have missed me, Say I'm growing old, but add-- Jenny kissed me!

48

Traveling in the company of those we love is home in motion.

37

Colors are the smiles of nature.

35

Patience and gentleness is power.

30

Central depth of purple, Leaves more bright than rose, Who shall tell what brightest thought Out of darkness grows? Who, through what funereal pain, Souls to love and peace attain? - Leigh Hunt (James Henry Leigh Hunt

28

Music is the medicine of the breaking heart.

24

Your second-hand bookseller is second to none in the worth of the treasures he dispenses.

19

Stolen sweets are always sweeter, Stolen kisses much completer, Stolen looks are nice in chapels, Stolen, stolen be your apples.

18

About Leigh Hunt

Quotes 104 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

There are two worlds: The world that we can measure with line and rule, and the world we feel with our hearts and imaginations.

18

The very greatest genius, after all, is not the greatest thing in the world, any more than the greatest city in the world is the country or the sky. It is the concentration of some of its greatest powers, but it is not the greatest diffusion of its might. It is not the habit of its success, the stability of its sereneness.

16

Whatever evil befalls us, we ought to ask ourselves.

.. how we can turn it into good. So shall we take occasion, from one bitter root, to raise perhaps many flowers.

14

The same people who can deny others everything are famous for refusing themselves nothing.

14

Where the mouth is sweet and the eyes intelligent, there is always the look of beauty, with a right heart.

11

When moral courage feels that it is in the right, there is no personal daring of which it is incapable.

10

The person who can be only serious or only cheerful, is but half a man.

10

God made both tears and laughter, and both for kind purposes;

for as laughter enables mirth and surprise to breathe freely, so tears enable sorrow to vent itself patiently. Tears hinder sorrow from becoming despair and madness.

9

It is a delicious moment, certainly, that of being well nestled in bed, and feeling that you shall drop gently to sleep. The good is to come, not past; the limbs have just been tired enough to render the remaining in one posture delightful; the labour of the day is gone

9

Occupation is the necessary basis of all enjoyment.

9

If you become a Nun, dear, The bishop Love will be;

The Cupids every one, dear! Will chant-'We trust in thee!'

8

If you are ever at a loss to support a flagging conversation, introduce the subject of eating.

5

Affection, like melancholy, magnifies trifles.

4

Those who have lost an infant are never, in a way, without an infant.

4

One can love any man that is generous.

4

Night's deepest gloom is but a calm; that soothes the weary mind: The labored days restoring balm; the comfort of mankind.

4

Fail not to call to mind, in the course of the twenty-fifth of this month, that the Divinest Heart that ever walked the earth was born on that day; and then smile and enjoy yourselves for the rest of it; for mirth is also of Heaven's making.

4

"Books ... books, ..." he exclaims. It is those that teach us to refine on our pleasures when young, and which, having so taught us, enable us to recall them with satisfaction when old.

4

Tears hinder sorrow from becoming despair.

3

For the most part, we should pray rather in aspiration than petition, rather by hoping than requesting; in which spirit also we may breathe a devout wish for a blessing on others upon occasions when it might be presumptuous to beg it.

3

Beauty too often sacrifices to fashion.

3

May exalting and humanizing thoughts forever accompany me, making me confident without pride, and modest without servility.

3

Nature, at all events, humanly speaking, is manifestly very fond of color;

for she has made nothing without it. Her skies are blue; her fields, green; her waters vary with her skies; her animals, vegetables, minerals, are all colored. She paints a great any of them in apparently superfluous hues, as if to show the dullest eye how she loves color.

3

If you are melancholy for the first time, you will find, upon a little inquiry, that others have been melancholy many times, and yet are cheerful now.

3

The only place a new hat can be carried into with safety is a church, for there is plenty of room there.

3

Part of our good consists in the endeavor to do sorrows away, and in the power to sustain them when the endeavor fails,--to bear them nobly, and thus help others to bear them as well.

3

No wonder is greater than any other wonder, and if once explained ceases to be a wonder.

3

There is scarcely a single joy or sorrow within the experience of our fellow-creatures which we have not tasted; yet the belief, in the good and beautiful has never forsaken us. It has been medicine to us in sickness, richness in poverty, and the best part of all that ever delighted us in health and success.

3

Beauty too often sacrifices to fashion.

The spirit of fashion is not the beautiful, but the wilful; not the graceful, but the fantastic; not the superior in the abstract, but the superior in the worst of all concretes,-the vulgar.

3

We must regard all matter as an intrusted secret which we believe the person concerned would wish to be considered as such. Nay, further still, we must consider all circumstances as secrets intrusted which would bring scandal upon another if told.

3

Tears and sorrows and losses are a part of what must be experienced in this present state of life: some for our manifest good, and ail, therefore, it is trusted, for our good concealed;--for our final and greatest good.

3

The more sensible a woman is, supposing her not to be masculine, the more attractive she is in her proportionate power to entertain.

3

For the qualities of sheer wit and humor, Swift had no superior, ancient or modern.

3

O scaly, slippery, wet, swift, staring wights, What is 't ye do? what life lead? eh, dull goggles? How do ye vary your vile days and nights? How pass your Sundays? Are ye still but joggles In ceaseless wash? Still nought but gapes and bites, And drinks, and stares, diversified with boggles.

3

Affection, like melancholy, magnifies trifles;

but the magnifying of the one is like looking through a telescope at heavenly objects; that of the other, like enlarging monsters with a microscope.

3

Bread, milk and butter are of venerable antiquity. They taste of the morning of the world.

2

Great woman belong to history and to self sacrifice.

2
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