The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun.

— Robert Herrick

The most perspective Robert Herrick quotes that are simple and will have a huge impact on you

That age is best which is the first When youth and blood are warmer.

61

Then be not coy, but use your time; And while ye may, go marry: For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry.

61

But ne'er the rose without the thorn.

57

Bid me despair, and I'll despair,Under that cypress tree;

Or bid me die, and I will dareE'en Death, to die for thee.

52

Bid me to love, and I will give a loving heart to thee.

43

What though the sea be calm? trust to the shore, Ships have been drown'd, where late they danc'd before.

18

Conquer we shall, but, we must first contend! It's not the fight that crowns us, but the end.

17

Fain would I kiss my Julia's dainty leg, Which is as white and hairless as an egg.

15

He loves his bonds who, when the first are broke, Submits his neck into a second yoke.

15

Give me a kiss, and to that kiss a score;

Then to that twenty, add a hundred more: A thousand to that hundred: so kiss on, To make that thousand up a million. Treble that million, and when that is done, Let's kiss afresh, as when we first begun.

13

Buying, possessing, accumulating--this is not worldliness.

But doing this in the love of it, with no love of God paramount--doing it so that thoughts of eternity and God are an intrusion--doing it so that one's spirit is secularized in the process; this is worldliness.

13

A spark neglected makes a mighty fire.

13

About Robert Herrick

Quotes 124 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

Oft have I heard both youths and virgins say, Birds chuse their mates and couple too this day: But by their flight I never can devine When I shall couple with my valentine.

11

I sing of brooks, of blossoms, birds, and bowers: Of April, May, or June, and July flowers. I sing of Maypoles, Hock-carts, wassails, wakes, Of bridegrooms, brides, and of the bridal cakes.

11

Fair daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon: As yet the early-rising sun Has not attained his noon.

11

Tears are the noble language of the eye.

10

Who with a little cannot be content, endures an everlasting punishment.

9

In things a moderation keep; Kings ought to shear, not skin, their sheep.

7

Against diseases here the strongest fence is the defensive vertue, Abstinence.

6

Show me thy feet, show me thy legs, thy thighs Show me those fleshy principalities; Show me that hill where smiling love doth sit, Having a living fountain under it; Show me thy waist, then let me there withal, By the ascension of thy lawn, see all.

6

He who has suffered shipwreck, fears to sail Upon the seas, though with a gentle gale.

6

Hast thou attempted greatnesse? Then go on; Back-turning slackens resolution.

6

Humble we must be, if to heaven we go; High is the roof there, but the gate is low.

5

When one is past, another care we have; Thus woe succeeds a woe, as wave a wave.

5

Some asked me where the rubies grew, And nothing I did say;

But with my finger pointed to The lips of Julia.

5

The body is the soul's poor house or home, whose ribs the laths are and whose flesh the loam.

5

Here a pretty Baby lies Sung asleep with Lullabies: Pray be silent, and not stirre The easie earth that covers her.

5

A sweet disorder in the dress Kindles in clothes a wantonness A lawn about the shoulders thrown Into a fine distraction.

4

Know when to speak - for many times it brings danger, to give the best advice to kings.

4

It takes great wit and interest and energy to be happy.

The pursuit of happiness is a great activity. One must be open and alive. It is the greatest feat man has to accomplish.

4

Give me a kiss, and to that kiss a score: Then to that twenty, add a hundred more.

4

Let wealth come in by comely thrift, And not by any sordid shift;

'T is haste Makes waste; Extremes have still their fault. Who gripes too hard the dry and slipp'ry sand, Holds none at all, or little, in his hand.

4

Go to your banquet then, but use delight So as to rise still with an appetite.

4

Fight thou with shafts of silver, and o'ercome When no force else can get the masterdom

3

Lord, 'tis Thy plenty-dropping hand That soils my land, And giv'st me for my bushel sowne Twice ten for one. All this, and better, Thou dost send Me, to this end, That I should render, for my part, A thankful heart.

3

Tears are the noble language of eyes, and when true love of words is destitute.

The eye by tears speak, while the tongue is mute.

3

Her eyes the glowworm lend thee, The shooting stars attend thee;

And the elves also, Whose little eyes glow Like the sparks of fire, befriend thee.

3

A careless shoe string, in whose tie I see a wilde civility.

3

In the hour of my distress, When temptations me oppress, And when I my sins confess, Sweet Spirit, comfort me.

3

Praise they that will times past, I joy to see My selfe now live: this age best pleaseth mee.

3

Happy is the bride that the sun shines on.

3

None pities him that is in the snare, who warned before, would not beware.

3

Who after his transgression doth repent, Is halfe, or altogether, innocent.

3

Who covets more is evermore a slave.

3

Tis not the food, but the content, That makes the table's merriment.

3

Temptations hurt not, though they have accesse; Satan o'ercomes none but by willingnesse.

3

Things are evermore sincere; / Candor here, and lustre there / Delighting.

2

Give, if thou can, an alms; if not, a sweet and gentle word.

2

Love is a circle that doth restless move in the same sweet eternity of love.

2
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