Life is not merely to be alive, but to be well.

— Martial

The most unbelievable Martial quotes that are glad to read

Why do strong arms fatigue themselves with frivolous dumbbells? To dig a vineyard is worthier exercise for men.

61

There is nothing more revolting than an old busybody.

51

Rarity gives a charm; so early fruits and winter roses are the most prized; and coyness sets off an extravagant mistress, while the door always open tempts no suitor.

50

I would not miss your face, your neck, your hands, your limbs, your bosom and certain other of your charms. Indeed, not to become boring by naming them all, I could do without you, Chloe, altogether.

48

There is no living with thee, nor without thee.

15

Remember, cobbler, to keep to your leather. [Lat., Memento, in pellicula, cerdo, tenere tuo.]

14

Conceal a flaw, and the world will imagine the worst.

12

He who writes distichs, wishes, I suppose, to please by brevity.

But, tell me, of what avail is their brevity, when there is a whose book full of them?

12

There is no glory in outstripping donkeys.

11

The African lions rush to attack bulls;

they do not attack butterflies. [Lat., In tauros Libyci ruunt leones; Non sunt papilionibus molesti.]

10

Wine and women bring misery.

10

You're obstinate, pliant, merry, morose, all at once.

For me there's no living with you, or without you.

9

About Martial

Quotes 159 sayings
Profession Poet
Birthday March 1, 40

The bee is enclosed, and shines preserved in amber, so that it seems enshrined in its own nectar.

8

He who weighs his burdens, can bear them.

8

Believing hear, what you deserve to hear: Your birthday as my own to me is dear... But yours gives most; for mine did only lend Me to the world; yours gave to me a friend.

8

It is easy in adversity to despise death; he has real fortitude who dares to live and be wretched.

8

Givers of great dinners know few enemies.

7

Virtue extends our days: he lives two lives who relives his past with pleasure.

7

A good man enlarges the term of his own existence.

6

It is feeling and force of imagination that make us eloquent.

6

She grieves sincerely who grieves unseen.

6

Can the fish love the fisherman? [Lat., Piscatorem piscis amare potest?]

6

Spare the person but lash the vice.

5

If your slave commits a fault, do not smash his teeth with your fists;

give him some of the (hard) biscuit which famous Rhodes has sent you.

5

If fame comes after death, I'm in no hurry for it. [Lat., Si post fata venit gloria non propero.]

5

My poems are naughty, but my life is pure.

5

All your female friends are either old or ugly;

nay, more ugly than old women usually are. These you lead about in your train, and drag with you to feasts, porticos and theaters. Thus, Fabulla, you seem handsome, thus you seem young.

4

There is nothing more contemptible than a bald man who pretends to have hair.

4

The flaw which is hidden is deemed greater than it is.

4

It is not he who forms idols in gold or marble that makes them gods, but he who kneels before them.

4

Service cannot be expected from a friend in service;

let him be a freeman who wishes to be my master.

4

If my opinion is of any worth, the fieldfare is the greatest delicacy among birds, the hare among quadrupeds.

3

Your page stands against you and says to you that you are a thief.

3

One genius has made many clever artists.

3

Joys do not stay, but take wing and fly away.

3

I am a shell-fish just come from being saturated with the waters of the Lucrine lake, near Baiae; but now I luxuriously thrust for noble pickle.

3

You are sad in the midst of every blessing.

Take care that Fortune does not observe--or she will call you ungrateful.

3

A vagrant is everywhere at home.

3

You should not fear, nor yet should you wish for your last day.

3

Short is the life of those who possess great accomplishments, and seldom do they reach a good old age. Whatever thou lovest, pray that thou mayest not set too high a value on it.

3

You praise, in three hundred verses, Sabellus, the baths of Ponticus, who gives such excellent dinners. You wish to dine, Sabellus, not to bathe.

3

I seem to you cruel and too much addicted to gluttony, when I beat my cook for sending up a bad dinner. If that appears to you too trifling a cause, say for what cause you would have a cook flogged.

3

If you want him to mourn, you had best leave him nothing.

3

When your crowd of attendants so loudly applaud you, Pomponius, it is not you, but your banquet, that is eloquent.

3

Life is not living, but living in health.

3

Work divided is in that manner shortened.

3

See, how the liver is swollen larger than a fat goose! In amazement you will exclaim: Where could this possibly grow?

3

While you remain at home your hair is at the hairdresser's;

you take out your teeth at night and sleep tucked away in a hundred cosmetics boxes - even your face does not sleep with you.

3

Man loves malice, but not against one-eyed men nor the unfortunate, but against the fortunate and proud.

3
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