Civility costs nothing, and buys everything.

— Mary Wortley Montagu

The most remarkable Mary Wortley Montagu quotes that are proven to give you inner joy

There is nothing can pay one for that invaluable ignorance which is the companion of youth, those sanguine groundless hopes, and that lively vanity which makes all the happiness of life.

67

No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor is any pleasure so lasting.

37

People wish their enemies dead - but I do not; I say give them the gout, give them the stone!

27

No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting.

21

Nobody can deny but religion is a comfort to the distressed, a cordial to the sick, and sometimes a restraint on the wicked.

17

I wish you would moderate that fondness you have for your children.

I do not mean you should abate any part of your care, or not do your duty to them in its utmost extent, but I would have you early prepare yourself for disappointments, which are heavy in proportion to their being surprising.

17

The pretty fellows you speak of, I own entertain me sometimes, but is it impossible to be diverted with what one despises? I can laugh at a puppet show, at the same time I know there is nothing in it worth my attention or regard.

16

The ultimate end of your education was to make you a good wife.

12

There can be no situation in life in which the conversation of my dear sister will not administer some comfort to me.

11

Solitude begets whimsies.

9

I sometimes give myself admirable advice, but I am incapable of taking it.

9

Life is too short for a long story.

8

About Mary Wortley Montagu

Quotes 108 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Writer
Birthday October 16

I prefer liberty to chains of diamonds.

8

While conscience is our friend, all is at peace;

however once it is offended, farewell to a tranquil mind.

6

But the fruit that can fall without shaking Indeed is too mellow for me.

6

It was formerly a terrifying view to me that I should one day be an old woman.

I now find that Nature has provided pleasures for every state.

6

No modest man ever did or ever will make a fortune.

5

To always be loved one must ever be agreeable.

4

I hate the noise and hurry inseparable from great Estates and Titles, and look upon both as blessings that ought only to be given to fools, for 'Tis only to them that they are blessings.

4

People commonly educate their children as they build their houses, according to some plan they think beautiful, without considering whether it is suited to the purposes for which they are designed.

4

See how that pair of billing doves With open murmurs own their loves And, heedless of censorious eyes, Pursue their unpolluted joys: No fears of future want molest The downy quiet of their nest.

4

We are no more free agents than the queen of clubs when she victoriously takes prisoner the knave of hearts.

3

Be plain in dress, and sober in your diet; In short, my dear, kiss me and be quiet.

3

Conscience is justice's best minister;

it threatens, promises, rewards, and punishes and keeps all under control; the busy must attend to its remonstrances, the most powerful submit to its reproof, and the angry endure its upbraidings. While conscience is our friend all is peace; but if once offended farewell the tranquil mind.

3

It is the common error of builders and parents to follow some plan they think beautiful (and perhaps is so) without considering that nothing is beautiful that is misplaced.

3

Writers of novels and romance in general bring a double loss to their readers;

robbing them of their time and money; representing men, manners, and things, that never have been, or are likely to be.

3

The use of knowledge in our sex (beside the amusement of solitude) is to moderate the passions and learn to be contented with a small expense, which are the certain effects of a studious life and, it may be, preferable even to that fame which men have engrossed to themselves and will not suffer us to share.

3

And we meet, with champagne and a chicken, at last.

3

Lord Bacon makes beauty to consist of grace and motion.

3

Satire should, like a polished razor keen, Wound with a touch that's scarcely felt or seen.

3

Copiousness of words, however ranged, is always false eloquence, though it will ever impose on some sort of understandings.

3

I despise the pleasure of pleasing people that I despise.

3

I have never, in all my various travels, seen but two sorts of people I mean men and women, who always have been, and ever will be, the same. The same vices and the same follies have been the fruit of all ages, though sometimes under different names.

3

We travellers are in very hard circumstances.

If we say nothing but what has been said before us, we are dull and have observed nothing. If we tell anything new, we are laughed at as fabulous and romantic.

3

A man that is ashamed of passions that are natural and reasonable is generally proud of those that are shameful and silly.

3

No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor any pleasure so lasting.

She will not want new fashions nor regret the loss of expensive diversions or variety of company if she can be amused with an author in her closet.

3

It goes far towards reconciling me to being a woman, when I reflect that I am thus in no danger of ever marrying one.

3

Prudent people are very happy; 'tis an exceeding fine thing, that's certain, but I was born without it, and shall retain to my day of Death the Humour of saying what I think.

3

I don't say 'Tis impossible for an impudent man not to rise in the world, but a moderate merit with a large share of impudence is more probable to be advanced than the greatest qualifications without it.

2

Nature is seldom in the wrong, custom always.

2

Nobody should trust their virtue with necessity, the force of which is never known till it is felt, and it is therefore one of the first duties to avoid the temptation of it.

1

It is 11 years since I have seen my figure in a glass [mirror].

The last reflection I saw there was so disagreeable I resolved to spare myself such mortification in the future.

1

People are never so near playing the fool as when they think themselves wise.

1

'Tis a sort of duty to be rich, that it may be in one's power to do good, riches being another word for power.

1

The familiarities of the gaming-table contribute very much to the decay of politeness ... The pouts and quarrels that naturally arise from disputes must put an end to all complaisance, or even good will towards one another.

0

Muse, time has taught me that all metaphysical systems, even historical facts given as truths, are hardly that, so I amuse myself with more agreeable lies; I no longer read anything but novels.

0

I have often observ'd the loudest Laughers to be the dullest Fellows in the Company.

0

We are apt to consider Shakespeare only as a poet;

but he was certainly one of the greatest moral philosophers that ever lived.

0

I am afraid we are little better than straws upon the water;

we may flatter ourselves that we swim, when the current carries us along.

0
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