Academic success depends on research and publications.

— Philip Zimbardo

The most delightful Philip Zimbardo quotes that will add value to your life

My early childhood prepared me to be a social psychologist.

I grew up in a South Bronx ghetto in a very poor family. From Sicilian origin, I was the first person in my family to complete high school, let alone go to college.

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Heroes are Ordinary People whose social action is Extra-Ordinary/ who ACT when others are passive, who give up EGO-centrism for SOCIO-centrism.

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The line between good and evil is permeable and almost anyone can be induced to cross it when pressured by situational forces.

47

What troubles me is the Internet and the electronic technology revolution.

Shyness is fueled in part by so many people spending huge amounts of time alone, isolated on e-mail, in chat rooms, which reduces their face-to-face contact with other people.

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To be a hero you have to learn to be a deviant — because you're always going against the conformity of the group.

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Bullies may be the perpetrators of evil, but it is the evil of passivity of all those who know what is happening and never intervene that perpetuates such abuse.

30

Evil is knowing better, but willingly doing worse.

28

Heroes are those who can somehow resist the power of the situation and act out of noble motives, or behave in ways that do not demean others when they easily can.

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I have been primarily interested in how and why ordinary people do unusual things, things that seem alien to their natures. Why do good people sometimes act evil? Why do smart people sometimes do dumb or irrational things?

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The world is, was, will always be filled with good and evil, because good and evil is the yin and yang of the human condition.

27

Coming from New York, I know that if you go by a delicatessen, and you put a sweet cucumber in the vinegar barrel, the cucumber might say, "No, I want to retain my sweetness." But it's hopeless. The barrel will turn the sweet cucumber into a pickle. You can't be a sweet cucumber in a vinegar barrel.

25

If you put good apples into a bad situation, you’ll get bad apples.

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About Philip Zimbardo

Quotes 78 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Psychologist
Birthday March 23, 1933

Our time is brief, and it will pass no matter what we do.

So let us have purpose in spending it. Let us spend it so that our time matters to each of us, and matters to all those whose lives we touch.

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The greatest gift that you can give to others and to yourself is time.

Embrace the gift of time whether you give it or receive it.

16

Prejudice and discrimination have always been a big part of my life. When I was 6, I got beat up and called dirty Jew boy because they thought I looked Jewish.

15

Time matters because we are finite, because time is the medium in which we live our lives.

13

Fear is the State's psychological weapon of choice to frighten citizens into sacrificing their basic freedoms and rule-of-law protections in exchange for the security promised by their all-powerful government.

12

Boys are 30 percent more likely than girls to drop out of school.

In Canada, five boys drop out for every three girls. Girls outperform boys now at every level, from elementary school to graduate school.

12

I've always been curious about the psychology of the person behind the mask.

When someone is anonymous, it opens the door to all kinds of antisocial behavior, as seen by the Ku Klux Klan.

10

Situational variables can exert powerful influences over human behavior, more so that we recognize or acknowledge.

10

You are not the same person working alone as you are in a group;

in a romantic setting versus an educational one; when you are with close friends or in an anonymous crowd; or when you are traveling abroad as when at home base.

8

Depending on whom you ask, time is money, time is love, time is work, time is play, time is enjoying friends, time is raising children, and time is much more. Time is what you make of it.

6

After doing psychology for half a century, my passion for all of it is greater than ever.

6

Human behavior is incredibly pliable, plastic.

6

The level of shyness has gone up dramatically in the last decade. I think shyness is an index of social pathology rather than a pathology of the individual.

4

Sticks and stones can break your bones, but names can kill you.

4

Careers in virtually all academic disciplines are fostered by being a superstar who knows more about one subject than anyone else in the world.

4

There are no limits to what I would do to make my classes exciting, interesting, unpredictable.

4

That human behavior is more influenced by things outside of us than inside.

The 'situation' is the external environment. The inner environment is genes, moral history, religious training.

4

Being hurt personally triggered a curiosity about how such beliefs are formed.

4

The Stanford prison experiment came out of class exercises in which I encouraged students to understand the dynamics of prison life.

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Societal expectations matter little; personal expectations matter tremendously.

4

I was discriminated against because I was Jewish, Italian, black and Puerto Rican. But maybe the worst prejudice I experienced was against the poor. I grew up on welfare and often had to move in the middle of the night because we couldn't pay the rent.

3

In one sense, the Stanford prison study is more like a Greek drama than a traditional experiment, in that we have humanity, represented by a bunch of good people, pitted against an evil-producing situation. The question is, does the goodness of the people overwhelm the bad situation, or does the bad situation overwhelm the good people?

3

I started studying shyness in adults in 1972.

Shyness operates at so many different levels. Out of that research came the Stanford shyness clinic in 1977.

3

Boys' brains are being digitally rewired for change, novelty, excitement and constant arousal. That means they're totally out of sync in traditional classes, which are analog, static, interactively passive.

3

The first time I spoke publicly about the Stanford Prison Experiment, Stanley Milgram told me: "Your study is going to take all the ethical heat off of my back. People are now going to say yours is the most unethical study ever, and not mine.

3

Time perspective is one of the most powerful influences on all of human behavior. We're trying to show how people become biased to being exclusively past-, present- or future-oriented.

3

The most dramatic instances of directed behavior change and "mind control" are not the consequence of exotic forms of influence, such as hypnosis, psychotropic drugs, or "brainwashing," but rather the systematic manipulation of the most mundane aspects of human nature over time in confining settings.

2

Bullies are often people who are shy and can't make friends easily, so, as the theme of the movie 'A Bronx Tale' tells us, it is better to be feared if you can't be loved.

2

Most of us fail to appreciate the extent to which our behavior is under situational control, because we prefer to believe that is all is internally generated. We wander around cloaked in an illusion of vulnerability, mis-armed with an arrogance of free will and rationality.

2

Heroism is the antidote to evil.

1

There are times when external circumstances can overwhelm us, and we do things we never thought. If you're not aware that this can happen, you can be seduced by evil. We need inoculations against our own potential for evil. We have to acknowledge it. Then we can change it.

0

Most of us hide behind egocentric biases that generate the illusion that we are special. These self-serving protective shields allow us to believe that each of us is above average on any test of self-integrity. Too often we look to the stars through the thick lens of personal invulnerability when we should also look down to the slippery slope beneath our feet.

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Part of what we want to do with the Heroic Imagination Project is to get kids to think about what it means to be a hero. The most basic concept of a hero is socially constructed: It differs from culture to culture and changes over time. Think of Christopher Columbus. Until recently, he was a hero. Now he's a genocidal murderer! If he were alive today, he'd say, "What happened? I used to be a hero, and now people are throwing tomatoes at me!

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As a result of the prison study, I really became more aware of the central role of power in our lives. I became more aware of the power I have as a teacher. I started consciously doing things to minimize the negative use of power in the classroom. I encouraged students to challenge me.

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A good cult delivers on its promises.

A good cult nourishes the needs of its members, has transparency and integrity, and creates provisions for challenging its leadership openly. A good cult expands the freedoms and well-being of its members rather than limits them.

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When I look back on it, I think, "Why didn't you stop the cruelty earlier?" To stand back was contrary to my upbringing and nature. When I stood back as a noninterfering experimental scientist, I was, in a sense, as drawn into the power of the situation as any prisoners and guards.

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We like to think there is this core of human nature – that good people can't do bad things, and that good people will dominate over bad situations. Infact, when we look at the Stanford prison studies, that we put good people in an evil place, and we saw who won. Well, the sad message in this, is in this case is the evil place won over the good people.

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