The battle of life is, in most cases, fought uphill; and to win it without a struggle were perhaps to win it without honor. If there were no difficulties there would be no success; if there were nothing to struggle for, there would be nothing to be achieved.

— Samuel Smiles

The most blissful Samuel Smiles quotes that will activate your inner potential

Lost wealth may be replaced by industry, lost knowledge by study, lost health by temperance or medicine, but lost time is gone forever.

70

Hope is like the sun, which, as we journey toward it, casts the shadow of our burden behind us.

57

The best school of discipline is home.

Family life is God's own method of training the young, and homes are very much as women make them.

54

Hope... is the companion of power, and the mother of success; for who so hopes has within him the gift of miracles.

54

The influence of woman is the same everywhere.

Her condition influences the morals, manners, and character of the people of all countries. Where she is debased, society is debased; where she is morally pure and enlightened, society will be proportionately elevated.

50

National progress is the sum of individual industry, energy, and uprightness, as national decay is of individual idleness, selfishness, and vice.

50

It is a mistake to suppose that men succeed through success;

they much oftener succeed through failures. Precept, study, advice, and example could never have taught them so well as failure has done.

36

No laws, however stringent, can make the idle industrious, the thriftless provident, or the drunken sober.

34

The very greatest things - great thoughts, discoveries, inventions - have usually been nurtured in hardship, often pondered over in sorrow, and at length established with difficulty.

33

The very greatest things -- great thoughts, discoveries, inventions -- have usually been nurtured in hardship, often pondered over in sorrow, and at length established with difficulty.

33

Self-respect is the noblest garment with which a man can clothe himself, the most elevating feeling with which the mind can be inspired.

30

The spirit of self-help is the root of all genuine growth in the individual;

and, exhibited in the lives of many, it constitutes the true source of national vigour and strength. Help from without is often enfeebling in its effects, but help from within invariably invigorates

27

About Samuel Smiles

Quotes 172 sayings
Nationality Scottish
Profession Author
Birthday October 16

It is possible that the scrupulously honest man may not grow rich so fast as the unscrupulous and dishonest one; but the success will be of a truer kind, earned without fraud or injustice. And even though a man should for a time be unsuccessful, still he must be honest: better lose all and save character. For character is itself a fortune. . . .

26

Progress however, of the best kind, is comparatively slow.

Great results cannot be achieved at once; and we must be satisfied to advance in life as we walk, step by step.

20

Marriage like government is a series of compromises.

One must give and take, repair and restrain, endure and be patient.

17

Childhood is like a mirror, which reflects in after life the images first presented to it.

16

Though an inheritance of acres may be bequeathed, an inheritance of knowledge and wisdom cannot. The wealthy man may pay others for doing his work for him; but it is impossible to get his thinking done for him by another, or to purchase any kind of self-culture.

16

If we opened our minds to enjoyment, we might find tranquil pleasures spread about us on every side. We might live with the angels that visit us on every sunbeam, and sit with the fairies who wait on every flower.

16

Obedience, submission, discipline, courage--these are among the characteristics which make a man.

15

The knowledge and experience which produce wisdom can only become a man's individual possession and property by his own free action; and it is as futile to expect these without laborious, painstaking effort, as it is to hope to gather a harvest where the seed has not been sown.

15

He who never made a mistake, never made a discovery.

14

Luck lies in bed, and wishes the postman would bring him news of a legacy;

labor turns out at six, and with busy pen or ringing hammer lays the foundation of a competence.

14

Luck whines; labor whistles.

13

The great and good do no die even in this world.

Embalmed in books, their spirits walk abroad. The book is a living voice. It is an intellect to which one still listens.

12

It will generally be found that men who are constantly lamenting their ill luck are only reaping the consequences of their own neglect, mismanagement, and improvidence, or want of application.

12

Enthusiasm... the sustaining power of all great action.

11

We learn wisdom from failure much more than from success.

We often discover what will do, by finding out what will not do; and probably he who never made a mistake never made a discovery.

11

The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.

10

The apprenticeship of difficulty is one which the greatest of men have had to serve.

9

It is the close observation of little things which is the secret of success in business, in art, in science, and in every pursuit in life. Human knowledge is but an accumulation of small facts made by successive generations of men--the little bits of knowledge and experience carefully treasured up by them growing at length into a mighty pyramid.

9

The work of many of the greatest men, inspired by duty, has been done amidst suffering and trial and difficulty. They have struggled against the tide, and reached the shore exhausted.

8

All experiences of life seems to prove that the impediments thrown in the way of the human advancement may for the most part be overcome by steady good conduct, honest zeal, activity, perseverance and above all, by a determined resolution to surmount.

7

For want of self-restraint many men are engaged all their lives in fighting with difficulties of their own making, and rendering success impossible by their own cross-grained ungentleness; whilst others, it may be much less gifted, make their way and achieve success by simple patience, equanimity, and self-control.

7

The spirit of self-help is the root of all genuine growth in the individual.

6

It is the close observation of little things which is the secret of success in business, in art, in science, and in every pursuit of life.

6

Riches do not constitute any claim to distinction.

It is only the vulgar who admire riches as riches.

6

Labor is still, and ever will be, the inevitable price set upon everything which is valuable.

6

Diligence, above all, is the mother of good luck.

5

The duty of helping one's self in the highest sense involves the helping of one's neighbors.

5

Labour may be a burden and a chastisement, but it is also an honour and a glory.

Without it, nothing can be accomplished.

5

The wise man... if he would live at peace with others, he will bear and forbear.

5

Nothing of real worth can be obtained without courageous working.

Man owes his growth chiefly to the active striving of the will, that encounter with difficulty which he calls effort; and it is astonishing to find how often results apparently impracticable are then made possible.

4

Great men are always exceptional men;

and greatness itself is but comparative. Indeed, the range of most men in life is so limited that very few have the opportunity of being great.

4

For want of self-restraint many men are engaged all their lives in fighting with difficulties of their own making.

4

The tiniest bits of opinion sown in the minds of children in private life afterwards issue forth to the world, and become its public opinion; for nations are gathered out of nurseries.

4

Fortune has often been blamed for her blindness;

but fortune is not so blind as men are. Those who look into practical life will find that fortune is usually on the side of the industrious, as the winds and waves are on the side of the best navigators.

4

Progress, of the best kind, is comparatively slow

4

The experience gathered from books, though often valuable, is but the nature of learning; whereas the experience gained from actual life is one of the nature of wisdom.

4

It is observed at sea that men are never so much disposed to grumble and mutiny as when least employed. Hence an old captain, when there was nothing else to do, would issue the order to "scour the anchor.

4
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