Never violate the sacredness of your individual self-respect.

— Theodore Parker

The most sentimental Theodore Parker quotes that are glad to read

Cities have always been the fireplaces of civilization, whence light and heat radiated out into the dark.

84

The books that help you most are those which make you think that most.

The hardest way of learning is that of easy reading; but a great book that comes from a great thinker is a ship of thought, deep freighted with truth and beauty.

50

Outward judgment often fails, inward judgment never.

27

I do not pretend to understand the moral universe;

the arc is a long one, my eye reaches but little ways; I cannot calculate the curve and complete the figure by the experience of sight, I can divine it by conscience. And from what I see I am sure it bends towards justice.

23

Democracy means not "I am as good as you are" but "You are as good as I am.".

22

The books that help you the most are those which make you think the most.

17

Self-denial is indispensable to a strong character, and the highest kind comes from a religious stock.

16

A happy wedlock is a long falling in love.

16

A democracy,- that is a government of all the people, by all the people, for all the people; of course, a government of the principles of eternal justice, the unchanging law of God; for shortness' sake I will call it the idea of Freedom.

15

There is no college for the conscience.

13

Nature is man's religious book, with lessons for every day.

12

I do not pretend to understand the moral universe;

the arc is a long one. . . . But from what I see I am sure it bends toward justice.

12

About Theodore Parker

Quotes 101 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Theologian
Birthday October 16

Never violate the sacredness of your individual self-respect.

Be true to your own mind and conscience, your heart and your soul. So only can you be true to God.

12

That which is called liberality is frequently nothing more than the vanity of giving.

9

Politics is the science of urgencies.

9

Disappointment is often the salt of life.

8

Gratitude is a nice touch of beauty added last of all to the countenance.

Giving a classic beauty, an angelic loveliness, to the character.

7

The miser, poor fool, not only starves his body, but also his own soul.

6

Remorse is the pain of sin.

5

The use of great men is to serve the little men, to take care of the human race, and act as practical interpreters of justice and truth.

5

It is very sad for a man to make himself servant to a single thing;

his manhood all taken out of him by the hydraulic pressure of excessive business.

5

Every man has at times in his mind the Ideal of what he should be, but is not.

This ideal may be high and complete, or it may be quite low and insufficient; yet in all men, that really seek to improve, it is better than the actual character... Man never falls so low, that he can see nothing higher than himself.

5

Pride is both a virtue and a vice.

5

Temperance is corporeal piety; it is the preservation of divine order in the body.

5

Let others laugh when you sacrifice desire to duty, if they will.

You have time and eternity to rejoice in.

4

All men need something to poetize and idealize their life a little-something which they value for more than its use, and which is a symbol of their emancipation from the mere materialism and drudgery of daily life.

4

Silence is a figure of speech, unanswerable, short, cold, but terribly severe.

4

Yet, if he would, man cannot live all to this world.

If not religious, he will be superstitious. IF he worship not the true God, he will have his idols.

4

He prays best who, not asking God to do man's work, prays penitence, prays resolutions, and then prays deeds--thus supplicating with heart and head and hands.

4

The great man is to be the servant of mankind, not they of him.

3

As society advances the standard of poverty rises.

3

Greatness is its own torment.

3

The most useful is the greatest.

3

Democracy is direct self-government over all the people, for all the people, by all the people.

3

The great basis of the Christian faith is compassion;

do not dismiss that from your hearts, neither will your Maker.

3

Want and wealth equally harden the human heart, as frost and fire are both alien to the human flesh. Famine and gluttony alike drive away nature from the heart of man.

3

Such a large sweet fruit is a complete marriage, that it needs a very long summer to ripen in and then a long winter to mellow and season it.

3

Intellect is stronger than cannon.

3

The diamond which shines in the Saviour's crown shall burn in unquenched beauty at last on the forehead of every human soul.

3

The earnestness of life is the only passport to satisfaction of life.

3

The whole sum and substance of human history may be reduced to this maxim: that when man departs from the divine means of reaching the divine end, he suffers harm and loss.

3

It seems strange that a butterfly's wing should be woven up so thin and gauzy in the monstrous loom of nature, and be so delicately tipped with fire from such a gross hand, and rainbowed all over in such a storm of thunderous elements. The marvel is that such great forces do such nice work.

3

In all the world there is nothing so remarkable as a great man, nothing so rare, nothing which so well repays study.

3

Wit has its place in debate; in controversy it is a legitimate weapon, offensive and defensive.

3

The Roman Christian mythology (and theology) discourages the vice of licentiousness, and so this is better than the heathen, but it encourages bigotry, hypocrisy, cant, and many another vice which the older Mother of Abominations kept clear from.

2

What sad faces one always sees in the asylums for orphans! It is more fatal to neglect the heart than the head.

1

Great success is a great temptation.

1

What a joy is there in a good book, writ by some great master of thought, who breaks into beauty as in summer the meadow into grass and dandelions and violets, with geraniums and manifold sweetness.

1

Wealth and want equally harden the human heart, like frost and fire both are alien to human flesh.

1
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