Right actions in the future are the best apologies for bad actions in the past.

— Tryon Edwards

The most whopping Tryon Edwards quotes that are free to learn and impress others

Any act often repeated soon forms a habit;

and habit allowed, steady gains in strength, At first it may be but as a spider's web, easily broken through, but if not resisted it soon binds us with chains of steel.

58

Some so speak in exaggerations and superlatives that we need to make a large discount from their statements before we can come at their real meaning.

53

We never reach our ideals, whether of mental or moral improvement, but the thought of them shows us our deficiencies, and spurs us on to higher and better things.

52

Always have a book at hand, in the parlor, on the table, for the family;

a book of condensed thought and striking anecdote, of sound maxims and truthful apothegms. It will impress on your own mind a thousand valuable suggestions, and teach your children a thousand lessons of truth and duty. Such a book is a casket of jewels for your housebold.

48

If you would thoroughly know anything, teach it to others.

47

Age does not depend upon years, but upon temperament and health.

Some men are born old, and some never grow so.

41

Some of the best lessons we ever learn we learn from our mistakes and failures.

— The error of the past is the wisdom and success of the future.

34

True humility is not an abject, groveling, self-despising spirit;

it is but a right estimate of ourselves as God sees us.

27

Between two evils, choose neither; between two goods, choose both.

24

The first step to improvement, whether mental, moral, or religious, is to know ourselves - our weaknesses, errors, deficiencies, and sins, that, by divine grace, we may overcome and turn from them all.

23

High aims form high characters, and great objects bring out great minds.

19

He that never changes his opinion never corrects mistakes and will never be wiser on the morrow than he is today.

18

About Tryon Edwards

Quotes 97 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Theologian
Birthday October 16

Sinful and forbidden pleasures are like poisoned bread;

they may satisfy appetite for the moment, but there is death in them at the end.

16

Seek for duty, and happiness will follow as the shadow comes with the sunshine.

13

Science has sometimes been said to be opposed to faith, and inconsistent with it. But all science, in fact, rests on a basis of faith, for it assumes the permanence and uniformity of natural laws - a thing which can never be demonstrated.

12

Science has sometimes been said to be opposed to faith, and inconsistent with it. But all science, in fact, rests on a basis of faith, for it assumes the permanence and uniformity of natural laws -- a thing which can never be demonstrated.

12

Credulity is belief in slight evidence, with no evidence, or against evidence.

12

Anxiety is the poison of human life; the parent of many sins and of more miseries.

11

Quiet and sincere sympathy is often the most welcome and efficient consolation to the afflicted. Said a wise man to one in deep sorrow, I did not come to comfort you; God only can do that; but I did come to say how deeply and tenderly I feel for you in your affliction.

10

Anecdotes are sometimes the best vehicles of truth, and if striking and appropriate are often more impressive and powerful than argument.

10

People never improve unless they look to some standard or example higher or better than themselves.

10

What we gave, we have; What we spent, we had; What we left, we lost.

9

Sincerity is not test of truth-no evidence of correctness of conduct.

You may take poison sincerely believing it the needed medicine, but will it save your life?

9

To waken interest and kindle enthusiasm is the sure way to teach easily and successfully.

9

To murder character is as truly a crime as to murder the body: the tongue of the slanderer is brother to the dagger of the assassin

8

We should be as careful of the books we read, as of the company we keep.

The dead very often have more power than the living.

7

Whoever in prayer can say, 'Our Father', acknowledges and should feel the brotherhood of the whole race of mankind.

6

To rule one's anger is well; to prevent it is better.

6

Contemplation is to knowledge what digestion is to food - the way to get life out of it

6

Compromise is but the sacrifice of one right or good in the hope of retaining another -- too often ending in the loss of both.

6

Nature hath nothing made so base, but can read some instruction to the wisest man.

6

Compromise is but the sacrifice of one right or good in the hope of retaining another - too often ending in the loss of both.

5

Doubt, indulged and cherished, is in danger of becoming denial;

but if honest, and bent on thorough investigation, it may soon lead to full establishment of the truth.

5

Anxiety is the rust of life, destroying its brightness and weakening its power.

A childlike and abiding trust in Providence is its best preventive and remedy.

5

There is nothing so elastic as the human mind.

The more we are obliged to do, the more we are able to accomplish.

5

Anxiety is the poison of human life; the parent of many sins and of more miseries. In a world where everything is doubtful, and where we may be disappointed, and be blessed in disappointment, why this restless stir and commotion of mind? Can it alter the cause, or unravel the mystery of human events?

5

Age does not depend upon years, but upon temperament and health.

Some men are born old, and some never grow up.

4

Most of our censure of others is only oblique praise of self, uttered to show the wisdom and superiority of the speaker. It has all the invidiousness of self-praise, and all the ill-desert of falsehood.

4

The slanderer and the assassin differ only in the weapon they use;

with the one it is the dagger, with the other the tongue. The former is worse that the latter, for the last only kills the body, while the other murders the reputation.

4

Accuracy is the twin brother of honesty; inaccuracy is a near kin to falsehood.

3

Sin with the multitude, and your responsibility and guilt are as great and as truly personal, as if you alone had done the wrong

3

The secret of a good memory is attention, and attention to a subject depends upon our interest in it. We rarely forget that which has made a deep impression on our minds.

3

Never be so brief as to become obscure.

3

Mystery is but another name for ignorance; if we were omniscient, all would be perfectly plain!

3

There is often as much independence in not being led as in not being driven.

3

He that is possessed with a prejudice is possessed with a devil, and one of the worst kinds of devils, for it shuts out the truth, and often leads to ruinous error.

3

Some men are born old, and some men never seem so.

If we keep well and cheerful, we are always young and at last die in youth even when in years would count as old.

3

Where duty is plain delay is both foolish and hazardous;

where it is not, delay may be both wisdom and safety.

3

Ridicule may be the evidence of with or bitterness and may gratify a little mind, or an ungenerous temper, but it is no test of reason or truth.

3
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