It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere.

— Agnes Repplier

The most sublime Agnes Repplier quotes that are little-known but priceless

He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog.

You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion. Our dogs will love and admire the meanest of us, and feed our colossal vanity with their uncritical homage.

74

What monstrous absurdities and paradoxes have resisted whole batteries of serious arguments, and then crumbled swiftly into dust before the ringing death-knell of a laugh!

36

It is because of our unassailable enthusiasm, our profound reverence for education, that we habitually demand of it the impossible. The teacher is expected to perform a choice and varied series of miracles.

33

It takes time and trouble to persuade ourselves that the things we want to do are the things we ought to do.

31

America has invested her religion as well as her morality in sound income-paying securities. She has adopted the unassailable position of a nation blessed because it deserves to be blessed; and her sons, whatever other theologies they may affect or disregard, subscribe unreservedly to this national creed.

28

The essence of humor is that it should be unexpected, that it should embody an element of surprise, that it should startle us out of that reasonable gravity which, after all, must be our habitual frame of mind.

27

Our dogs will love and admire the meanest of us, and feed our colossal vanity with their uncritical homage.

27

There are few nudities so objectionable as the naked truth.

25

I am seventy years old, a gray age weighted with uncompromising biblical allusions. It ought to have a gray outlook, but it hasn't, because a glint of dazzling sunshine is dancing merrily ahead of me.

24

It is not what we learn in conversation that enriches us.

It is the elation that comes of swift contact with tingling currents of thought.

23

abroad it is our habit to regard all other travelers in the light of personal and unpardonable grievances. They are intruders into our chosen realms of pleasure, they jar upon our sensibilities, they lessen our meager share of comforts, they are everywhere in our way, they are always an unnecessary feature in the landscape.

23

Humor distorts nothing, and only false gods are laughed off their earthly pedestals.

23

About Agnes Repplier

Quotes 197 sayings
Nationality American
Profession Writer
Birthday October 16

A real dog, beloved and therefore pampered by his mistress, is a lamentable spectacle. He suffers from fatty degeneration of his moral being.

21

The gayety of life, like the beauty and the moral worth of life, is a saving grace, which to ignore is folly, and to destroy is crime. There is no more than we need; there is barely enough to go round.

18

Conversation between Adam and Eve must have been difficult at times, because they had nobody to talk about.

18

Neatness of phrase is so closely akin to wit that it is often accepted as its substitute.

15

We owe to one another all the wit and good humour we can command;

and nothing so clears our mental vistas as sympathetic and intelligent conversation.

12

Erudition, like a bloodhound, is a charming thing when held firmly in leash, but it is not so attractive when turned loose upon a defenseless and unerudite public.

12

The impulse to travel is one of the hopeful symptoms of life.

12

A kitten is the most irresistible comedian in the world.

Its wide-open eyes gleam with wonder and mirth. It darts madly at nothing at all, and then, as though suddenly checked in the pursuit, prances sideways on its hind legs with ridiculous agility and zeal.

12

I wonder what especial sanctity attaches itself to fifteen minutes.

It is always the maximum and the minimum of time which will enable us to acquire languages, etiquette, personality, oratory ... One gathers that twelve minutes a day would be hopelessly inadequate, and twenty minutes a wasteful and ridiculous excess.

11

People who pin their faith to a catchword never feel the necessity of understanding anything.

11

A puppy is but a dog, plus high spirits, and minus common sense.

10

Personally, I do not believe that it is the duty of any man or woman to write a novel. In nine cases out of ten, there would be greater merit in leaving it unwritten.

9

Humor brings insight and tolerance. Irony brings a deeper and less friendly understanding.

9

Believers in political faith-healing enjoy a supreme immunity from doubt.

9

fair play is less characteristic of groups than of individuals.

8

The clear-sighted do not rule the world, but they sustain and console it.

7

The dog is guided by kindly instinct to the man or woman whose heart is open to his advances. The cat often leaves the friend who courts her, to honor, or to harass, the unfortunate mortal who shudders at her unwelcome caresses.

7

There is no illusion so permanent as that which enables us to look backward with complacency; there is no mental process so deceptive as the comparing of recollections with realities.

7

There is a vast deal of make-believe in the carefully nurtured sentiment for country life, and the barefoot boy, and the mountain girl.

7

When the contemplative mind is a French mind, it is content, for the most part, to contemplate France. When the contemplative mind is an English mind, it is liable to be seized at any moment by an importunate desire to contemplate Morocco or Labrador.

7

It is impossible for a lover of cats to banish these alert, gentle, and discriminating friends, who give us just enough of their regard and complaisance to make us hunger for more.

7

Humor brings insight and tolerance.

6

There is an optimism which nobly anticipates the eventual triumph of great moral laws, and there is an optimism which cheerfully tolerates unworthiness.

6

Edged tools are dangerous things to handle, and not infrequently do much hurt.

6

The friendships of nations, built on common interests, cannot survive the mutability of those interests.

6

It is not begging but the beggar, who has forfeited favor with the elect.

6

In those happy days when leisure was held to be no sin, men and women wrote journals whose copiousness both delights and dismays us.

5

It is impossible to withhold education from the receptive mind, as it is impossible to force it upon the unreasoning.

5

It is in his pleasure that a man really lives;

it is from his leisure that he constructs the true fabric of self.

5

There is nothing in the world so enjoyable as a thorough-going monomania...

5

the most comfortable characteristic of the period [1775-1825], and the one which incites our deepest envy, is the universal willingness to accept a good purpose as a substitute for good work.

5

the tea-hour is the hour of peace ... strife is lost in the hissing of the kettle - a tranquilizing sound, second only to the purring of a cat.

5

The tourist may complain of other tourists, but he would be lost without them.

5

Just as we are often moved to merriment for no other reason than that the occasion calls for seriousness, so we are correspondingly serious when invited too freely to be amused.

5

We cannot really love anybody with whom we never laugh.

5

A kitten is chiefly remarkable for rushing about like mad at nothing whatever and generally stopping before it gets there.

5

No rural community, no suburban community, can ever possess the distinctive qualities that city dwellers have for centuries given to the world.

4
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