The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.

— Jean Piaget

The most colorful Jean Piaget quotes that will activate your inner potential

Are we forming children who are only capable of learning what is already known? Or should we try to develop creative and innovative minds, capable of discovery from the preschool age on, throughout life?

526

Children have real understanding only of that which they invent themselves, and each time that we try to teach them too quickly, we keep them from reinventing it themselves.

467

Education, for most people, means trying to lead the child to resemble the typical adult of his society . . . but for me and no one else, education means making creators. . . . You have to make inventors, innovators...not conformists

457

Intelligence is what you use when you don't know what to do.

401

What is desired is that the teacher ceased being a lecturer, satisfied with transmitting ready-made solutions. His role should rather be that of a mentor stimulating initiative and research.

213

It is with children that we have the best chance of studying the development of logical knowledge, mathematical knowledge, physical knowledge, and so forth.

207

Only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual.

201

During the earliest stages the child perceives things like a solipsist who is unaware of himself as subject and is familiar only with his own actions.

195

The principal goal of education is to create men who are capable of doing new things, not simply of repeating what other generations have done-men who are creative, inventive, and discovers. The second goal of education is to form minds which can be critical, can verify, and not accept everything they are offered.

128

Logical positivists have never taken psychology into account in their epistemology, but they affirm that logical beings and mathematical beings are nothing but linguistic structures.

78

In genetic epistemology, as in developmental psychology, too, there is never an absolute beginning.

75

Our problem, from the point of view of psychology and from the point of view of genetic epistemology, is to explain how the transition is made from a lower level of knowledge to a level that is judged to be higher.

73

About Jean Piaget

Quotes 73 sayings
Nationality Swiss
Profession Psychologist
Birthday October 16

Logic and mathematics are nothing but specialised linguistic structures.

62

I am convinced that there is no sort of boundary between the living and the mental or between the biological and the psychological. From the moment an organism takes account of a previous experience and adapts to a new situation, that very much resembles psychology.

58

Before games are played in common, no rules in the proper sense can come into existence. Regularities and ritualized schemas are already there, but these rites, being the work of the individual, cannot call forth that submission to something superior to the self which characterizes the appearance of any rule.

55

Equilibrium is the profoundest tendency of all human activity.

50

The child who defines a lie as being a "naughty word" knows perfectly well that lying consists in not speaking the truth. He is not, therefore, mistaking one thing for another, he is simply identifying them one with another by what seems to us a quaint extension of the word "lie".

49

To understand is to invent.

35

Moral autonomy appears when the mind regards as necessary an ideal that is independent of all external pressures.

33

This means that no single logic is strong enough to support the total construction of human knowledge.

31

The essential functions of the mind consist in understanding and in inventing, in other words, in building up structures by structuring reality.

31

Scientific thought, then, is not momentary; it is not a static instance; it is a process.

31

Punishment renders autonomy of conscience impossible.

28

The more the schemata are differentiated, the smaller the gap between the new and the familiar becomes, so that novelty, instead of constituting an annoyance avoided by the subject, becomes a problem and invites searching.

16

It was while teaching philosophy that I saw how easily one can say .

.. what one wants to say. ... In fact, I became particularly aware if the dangers of speculation ... It's so much easier than digging out the facts. You sit in your office and build a system. But with my training in biology, I felt this kind of undertaking precarious.

15

Reflective abstraction, however, is based not on individual actions but on coordinated actions.

12

Scientific knowledge is in perpetual evolution; it finds itself changed from one day to the next.

12

It is as his own mind comes into contact with others that truth will begin to acquire value in the child's eyes and will consequently become a moral demand that can be made upon him. As long as the child remains egocentric, truth as such will fail to interest him and he will see no harm in transposing facts in accordance with his desires.

9

To express the same idea in still another way, I think that human knowledge is essentially active.

9

The majority of parents are poor psychologists and give their children the most questionable moral trainings. It is perhaps in this domain that one realized most how keenly how immoral it can be to believe too much in morality, and how much more precious is a little humanity than all the rules in the world.

9

If mutual respect does derive from unilateral respect, it does so by opposition.

8

As you know, Bergson pointed out that there is no such thing as disorder but rather two sorts of order, geometric and living.

7

In other words, knowledge of the external world begins with an immediate utilisation of things, whereas knowledge of self is stopped by this purely practical and utilitarian contact.

6

I have always detested any departure from reality, an attitude which I relate to my mother's poor mental health.

6

During the earliest stages of thought, accommodation remains on the surface of physical as well as social experience.

6

Every acquisition of accommodation becomes material for assimilation, but assimilation always resists new accommodations.

5

As far as the game of marbles is concerned, there is therefore no contradiction between the egocentric practice of games and the mystical respect entertained for rules. This respect is the mark of a mentality fashioned, not by free cooperation between equals, but by adult constraint.

5

If you want to be creative, stay in part a child, with the creativity and invention that characterizes children before they are deformed by adult society.

4

Chance... in the accommodation peculiar to sensorimotor intelligence, plays the same role as in scientific discovery. It is only useful to the genius and its revelations remain meaningless to the unskilled.

2

There is little mysticism without an element of transcendence, and conversely, there is no transcendence without a certain degree of egocentrism. It may be that the genesis of these experiences is to be sought in the unique situation of the very young child in relation to adults. The theory of the filial origin of the religious sense seems to us singularly convincing in this connection.

0

From this time on, the universe is built up into an aggregate of permanent objects connected by causal relations that are independent of the subject and are placed in objective space and time.

0

Play is the answer to how anything new comes about.

0

If a baby really has no awareness of himself and is totally thing-directed and at the same time all his states of mind are projected onto things, our second paradox makes sense: on the one hand, thought in babies can be viewed as pure accommodation or exploratory movements, but on the other this very same thought is only one, long, completely autistic waking dream.

0

How much more precious is a little humanity than all the rules in the world.

0

The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done; men and women who are creative, inventive and discoverers, who can be critical and verify, and not accept, everything they are offered.

0

The principle goal of education is to create men who are capable of doing new things, not simply of repeating what other generations have done -- men who are creative, inventive and discoverers.

0

What we see changes what we know. What we know changes what we see.

0

True interest appears when the self identifies itself with ideas or objects, when it finds in them a means of expression and they become a necessary form of fuel for its activity.

0

The most developed science remains a continual becoming

0
famous quotes