A liar begins with making falsehood appear like truth, and ends with making truth itself appear like falsehood.

— William Shenstone

The most restlessness William Shenstone quotes that will activate your desire to change

The proper means of increasing the love we bear our native country is to reside some time in a foreign one.

23

Jealousy is the fear or apprehension of superiority: envy our uneasiness under it.

17

Deference is the most complicate, the most indirect, and the most elegant of all compliments.

17

Hope is a flatterer, but the most upright of all parasites;

for she frequents the poor man's hut, as well as the palace of his superior.

17

A statue in a garden is to be considered as one part of a scene or landscape.

16

We may daily discover crowds acquire sufficient wealth to buy gentility, but very few that possess the virtues which ennoble human nature, and (in the best sense of the word) constitute a gentleman.

16

The difference there is betwixt honor and honesty seems to be chiefly the motive; the mere honest man does that from duty which the man of honor does for the sake of character.

15

Virtues, like essences, lose their fragrance when exposed.

15

The world may be divided into people that read, people that write, people that think, and fox-hunters.

11

Laws are generally found to be nets of such a texture, as the little creep through, the great break through, and the middle-sized are alone entangled in it.

10

Anger is a great force. If you control it, it can be transmuted into a power which can move the whole world.

8

A miser grows rich by seeming poor. An extravagant man grows poor by seeming rich.

7

About William Shenstone

Quotes 117 sayings
Nationality English
Profession Poet
Birthday October 16

Flattery of the verbal kind is gross.

In short, applause is of too coarse a nature to be swallowed in the gross, though the extract or tincture be ever so agreeable.

7

Zealous men are ever displaying to you the strength of their belief.

while judicious men are showing you the grounds of it.

6

Grandeur and beauty are so very opposite, that you often diminish the one as you increase the other. Variety is most akin to the latter, simplicity to the former.

6

Prudent men lock up their motives, letting familiars have a key to their hearts, as to their garden.

5

What leads to unhappiness is making pleasure the chief aim.

5

So sweetly she bade me adieu, I thought that she bade me return.

4

A large retinue upon a small income, like a large cascade upon a small stream, tends to discover its tenuity.

4

To one who said, "I do not believe that there is an honest man in the world," another replied, "It is impossible that any one man should know all the world, but quite possible that one may know himself."

4

Poetry and consumption are the most flattering of diseases.

4

Patience is the panacea; but where does it grow, or who can swallow it?

4

The weak and insipid white wine makes at length excellent vinegar.

4

A man generally has the good or ill qualities he attributes to mankind.

4

Many persons, when exalted, assume an insolent humility, who behaved before with an insolent haughtiness.

3

A wound in the friendship of young persons, as in the bark of young trees, may be so grown over as to leave no scar. The case is very different in regard to old persons and old timber. The reason of this may be accountable from the decline of the social passions, and the prevalence of spleen, suspicion, and rancor towards the latter part of life.

3

Avarice is the most oppose of all characters to that of God Almighty, whose alone it is to give and not receive.

3

Virtues, like essences, lose their fragrance when exposed.

They are sensitive plants, which will not bear too familiar approaches.

3

Deference often shrinks and withers as much upon the approach of intimacy as the sensitive plant does upon the touch of one's finger.

3

Second thoughts oftentimes are the very worst of all thoughts.

3

Immoderate assurance is perfect licentiousness.

3

Whoe'er has travell'd life's dull round, Where'er his stages may have been, May sigh to think he still has found The warmest welcome at an inn.

3

It should seem that indolence itself would incline a person to be honest, as it requires infinitely greater pains and contrivance to be a knave.

3

It seems with wit and good-nature, Utrum horum mavis accipe.

Taste and good-nature are universally connected.

3

Taste and good-nature are universally connected.

3

Every single instance of a friend's insincerity increases our dependence on the efficacy of money.

3

The regard one shows economy, is like that we show an old aunt who is to leave us something at last.

3

The best time to frame an answer to the letters of a friend, is the moment you receive them. Then the warmth of friendship, and the intelligence received, most forcibly cooperate.

3

Learning, like money, may be of so base a coin as to be utterly void of use;

or, if sterling, may require good management to make it serve the purposes of sense or happiness.

3

Nothing is certain in London but expense.

3

Long sentences in a short composition are like large rooms in a little house.

3

Anger and the thirst of revenge are a kind of fever;

fighting and lawsuits, bleeding,--at least, an evacuation. The latter occasions a dissipation of money; the former, of those fiery spirits which cause a preternatural fermentation.

3

Taste is pursued at a less expense than fashion.

3

Thanks, oftenest obtrusive.

3

I have been formerly so silly as to hope that every servant I had might be made a friend; I am now convinced that the nature of servitude generally bears a contrary tendency. People's characters are to be chiefly collected from their education and place in life; birth itself does but little.

3

Persons are oftentimes misled in regard to their choice of dress by attending to the beauty of colors, rather than selecting such colors as may increase their own beauty.

3

Harmony of period and melody of style have greater weight than is generally imagined in the judgment we pass upon writing and writers. As a proof of this, let us reflect what texts of scripture, what lines in poetry, or what periods we most remember and quote, either in verse or prose, and we shall find them to be only musical ones.

3

There is nothing more universally commended than a fine day;

the reason is that people can commend it without envy.

3

Health is beauty, and the most perfect health is the most perfect beauty.

3
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