quote by Brendon Urie

I think anything you listen to is going to be different. You're going to listen to a song differently if you're just sitting around somewhere listening on your phone as opposed to sitting in a dark room listening to a vinyl album. It's going to be a totally different experience.

— Brendon Urie

Irresistibly Vinyl quotations

There's so much plastic in this culture that vinyl leopard skin is becoming an endangered synthetic.

The four building blocks of the universe are fire, water, gravel and vinyl.

The history of the music industry is inevitably also the story of the development of technology. From the player piano to the vinyl disc, from reel-to-reel tape to the cassette, from the CD to the digital download, these formats and devices changed not only the way music was consumed, but the very way artists created it.

You can't really take a vinyl record player on a plane so you're not going to have the same experience, but if you walk yourself away and allow yourself to experience these different moments with music, you're so much richer in experience for that. That's what I believe.

It was very important, and I felt like music ran through my blood lines, with my father being a deejay and teaching me about records. I always thought vinyl was just intriguing. A black piece of wax that spins on a turntable and nothing but good sound comes from it. So that inspiration just keeps me going in hip-hop.

Well, everybody faces the fact there really aren't many records stores around to just go and browse. Maybe browse online, yet that tactile feel of flipping through a stack of vinyl remains one of life's simple pleasures.

Steve Jobs was a digital pioneer, but when he went home, he listened to vinyl.

The rawness and the richness of music on vinyl almost went away, but it still seems to be on a lot of people’s radar, and for good reason. It does something different than more accessible means of music playing, like MP3 players and downloads and whatnot. You get in front of these archaic contraptions that go ’round and ’round.

I'm a big collector of vinyl - I have a record room in my house - and I've always had a huge soundtrack album collection.

Vinyl is the real deal. I've always felt like, until you buy the vinyl record, you don't really own the album. And it's not just me or a little pet thing or some kind of retro romantic thing from the past. It is still alive.

I think some songs are better on vinyl.

I think some songs are better on vinyl.

I would rather listen to it in a club! 80% of this album; put it on in a club and just rage! Play it super loud!

I love every type of listening format, from MP3s to CDs to vinyl.

There's something special about each one. It's a sign of the times. I love looking back, and even putting new music on vinyl - if it's right!

I love going back to vinyl! I still have a great vinyl collection that I'm building up every couple of months. It's something I love to do.

Oftentimes, when people cut a record from analog tape to vinyl, they digitize the music first; I did a little investigating and discovered that most vinyl records that I've ever heard were digitized before they were put onto vinyl.

I've always been a fan of vinyl. There's something about the ritual of it. Something about it holds its gravity, for some reason. Sometimes you'll put on music and the music fades into the background. But when you take that vinyl out and put it down, the music becomes the conversation as opposed to being the soundtrack to it.

When you'd buy vinyl, you'd have this lovely-sized object with a lovely picture, and you'd read the lyrics and usually there was something artistic that went with it.

It ain't no joke when you lose your vinyl.

My musical influence is really from my father.

He was a DJ in college. My parents met at New York University. So he listened to, you know, Motown, and he listened to Bob Dylan. He listened to Grateful Dead and Rolling Stones, but he also listened to reggae music. And he collected vinyl.

I'm not extra'd out. I got a cool little vinyl collection.

In the '70s, anybody who was a connoisseur of collecting vinyl had the velvet brush. Remember the velvet brush? It would clean the record, and you would only grab the record from the sides and you would carefully slide it into the jacket. I never had a velvet brush.

I don't like to tell people what format they can get things in, or say, "I'm only going to release this on vinyl and nothing else. You have to come to my world." I don't like to say that to people either. But, I do think there's a loss of romance.

If God drives a car, He'd drive a 1973 Ford LTD Brougham sedan with a claret-colored vinyl roof, with oxblood leather upholstery and an opera window.

I hardly ever listen to any of our old stuff now.

Once the songs have been recorded and put on to vinyl they become someone else's entertainment, not mine.

People often forget this - a vinyl album could only contain a maximum of 20 minutes per side!

It was very nerve-wracking for me. I had to be drunk and have a threesome. I'm not that guy. Bobby Cannavale is that guy. But it was Vegas and things got crazy, and it happened. We go to Vegas to try to sign Elvis Presley and things get crazy. My character [in Vinyl] is stoned.

I've been making Bass Communion music longer than any kind of other music.

I don't know if you picked up a copy of a vinyl release I put out a couple of years ago of something called Altamont.

My older brother had a lot of Elvis on vinyl, and really, that was my first introduction to music during the Fifties.

If God drives a car, He'd drive a 1973 Ford LTD Brougham sedan with a claret-colored vinyl roof, with oxblood leather upholstery and an opera window.

I always say that as church falls into demise, we still have the inclination to congregate whether by a night of music or a festival, or just sitting down to listen to some vinyl.

You want to do something, you want to have the bravery to do something original.

And there will always be people who are like, the classicists who are like, 'No, but it's got to have this.' In life, there are people like that attached to every single thing that there is. These are the same people that are like, still playing vinyl.

I can assume that the younger generations will no longer know what vinyl was.

Maybe some kids will take their CD back to the shop, telling the shop owner they have a faulty disc and if they could please get a new one.

I always have been and will remain someone who loves real, 3D, substantial books. And I don't believe that it's a wistful, nostalgic interest like vinyl collectors. It's not the same thing.

People are buying more vinyl now than they did in the late '90s or 2000s.

I like having different mediums of the record. It's always interesting to see how the tapes end up looking because they are so tiny.

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